2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160359
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Students' Experiences of Being in Nurse/Patient Interactions
Abstract:
Nursing Students' Experiences of Being in Nurse/Patient Interactions
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Idczak, Sue, PhDc, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Medical College of Ohio
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3015 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH, 43614, USA
Contact Telephone:419-383-5855
The profession of nursing is both an art and a science. While nursing
practice intertwines the art and science of nursing, nursing education
focuses on the scientific behavioral outcomes of learning content
knowledge and nursing skills. The behaviorist scientific curricula of most
nursing schools are not congruent with nursing practice. Therefore, the
outcomes of nursing education do not pedagogically match the objectives of
nursing practice. Nursing educators do not know how nursing students learn
to intertwine art and science, the "being" of nursing. The purpose of this
study was to understand how student nurses make meaning of experiences of
"being" in nurse/patient interactions. This study was conceptualized using
HeideggerÆs philosophy of being and Vygotsky's social constructivist
theory of learning. Heidegger's philosophy describes "being" as a process
or activity of existing. Vygotsky's theory describes the learner as a
constructor of knowledge who actively searches for meaning in
transactional, socially constructed situations. The participants were 28
sophomore nursing students, enrolled in a basic fundamentals course and in
the first year of clinical experiences with patients in acute care
settings. The participants self-selected experiences to ejournal by
answering six open ended questions concerning their thoughts and feelings
of being in nurse/patient interactions. The data were analyzed using an
interpretive process true to hermeneutic phenomenology. Five themes were
identified: fear of interacting with patients; developing confidence;
becoming self aware; connecting with knowledge; and connecting with
patients. The relevance of the research is the understanding of the
process of learning as uncovered in the students' experiences. Nurse
educators could therefore enhance optimum cognitive and psychological
learning in the clinical and classroom environments.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Students' Experiences of Being in Nurse/Patient Interactionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160359-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Students' Experiences of Being in Nurse/Patient Interactions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Idczak, Sue, PhDc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical College of Ohio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3015 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH, 43614, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">419-383-5855</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sidczak@mco.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The profession of nursing is both an art and a science. While nursing <br/> practice intertwines the art and science of nursing, nursing education <br/> focuses on the scientific behavioral outcomes of learning content <br/> knowledge and nursing skills. The behaviorist scientific curricula of most <br/> nursing schools are not congruent with nursing practice. Therefore, the <br/> outcomes of nursing education do not pedagogically match the objectives of <br/> nursing practice. Nursing educators do not know how nursing students learn <br/> to intertwine art and science, the &quot;being&quot; of nursing. The purpose of this <br/> study was to understand how student nurses make meaning of experiences of <br/> &quot;being&quot; in nurse/patient interactions. This study was conceptualized using <br/> Heidegger&AElig;s philosophy of being and Vygotsky's social constructivist <br/> theory of learning. Heidegger's philosophy describes &quot;being&quot; as a process <br/> or activity of existing. Vygotsky's theory describes the learner as a <br/> constructor of knowledge who actively searches for meaning in <br/> transactional, socially constructed situations. The participants were 28 <br/> sophomore nursing students, enrolled in a basic fundamentals course and in <br/> the first year of clinical experiences with patients in acute care <br/> settings. The participants self-selected experiences to ejournal by <br/> answering six open ended questions concerning their thoughts and feelings <br/> of being in nurse/patient interactions. The data were analyzed using an <br/> interpretive process true to hermeneutic phenomenology. Five themes were <br/> identified: fear of interacting with patients; developing confidence; <br/> becoming self aware; connecting with knowledge; and connecting with <br/> patients. The relevance of the research is the understanding of the <br/> process of learning as uncovered in the students' experiences. Nurse <br/> educators could therefore enhance optimum cognitive and psychological <br/> learning in the clinical and classroom environments.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:52:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:52:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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