2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160361
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strategies for Typology Development Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Data
Abstract:
Strategies for Typology Development Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Data
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Knafl, Kathleen, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Yale University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 100 Church Street South, New Haven, CT, 06536, USA
Contact Telephone:203/737-5060
Co-Authors:Agatha M. Gallo, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Denise Angst, PhD, RN, Director; George J. Knafl, PhD; Emily K. Hadley, MS, RN, Research Analyst; and Carol Smith, MS, RN
Mixed method designs are well accepted in health care research. With
the increasing use of mixed method designs researchers are challenged to
devise analytic strategies that incorporate multiple types of data. Prior
efforts to delineate analytic strategies for linking qualitative and
quantitative data have focused on issues of consistency and the use of one
type of data to validate or explain the other. However, relatively little
attention has been directed to the use of mixed method approaches for
typology development. The aim of this presentation is to describe a mixed
method strategy for typology development that combines qualitative themes
and quantitative scores. Data come from a purposive sample of 44 parents
(22 couples) of children with a genetic condition. Individually, parents
completed semi-structured interviews and three structured measures of
family functioning (Family APGAR, Feetham Family Functioning Survey,
Family Hardiness Index). A thematic analysis of the qualitative data was
completed to identify patterns of family management of the genetic
condition, and a cluster analysis of the quantitative data was completed
to identify patterns of family functioning. Each parent was categorized
into a family management style based on the qualitative analysis. For the
cluster analysis, scores from the structured measures were used to
identify distinct patterns of family functioning. Final typology
development, which is in progress, will entail the identification of
individual family patterns based on parents' management style and cluster
analysis categorization followed by comparison across families to identify
distinct family management-functioning types. Results of the analysis will
be discussed in terms of traditional approaches to typology development
and the contribution of mixed method analyses to a more sophisticated
understanding of family functioning in the context of childhood chronic
illness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrategies for Typology Development Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Dataen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160361-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Strategies for Typology Development Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Data</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Knafl, Kathleen, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Yale University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 100 Church Street South, New Haven, CT, 06536, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">203/737-5060</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kathleen.knafl@yale.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Agatha M. Gallo, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Denise Angst, PhD, RN, Director; George J. Knafl, PhD; Emily K. Hadley, MS, RN, Research Analyst; and Carol Smith, MS, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Mixed method designs are well accepted in health care research. With <br/> the increasing use of mixed method designs researchers are challenged to <br/> devise analytic strategies that incorporate multiple types of data. Prior <br/> efforts to delineate analytic strategies for linking qualitative and <br/> quantitative data have focused on issues of consistency and the use of one <br/> type of data to validate or explain the other. However, relatively little <br/> attention has been directed to the use of mixed method approaches for <br/> typology development. The aim of this presentation is to describe a mixed <br/> method strategy for typology development that combines qualitative themes <br/> and quantitative scores. Data come from a purposive sample of 44 parents <br/> (22 couples) of children with a genetic condition. Individually, parents <br/> completed semi-structured interviews and three structured measures of <br/> family functioning (Family APGAR, Feetham Family Functioning Survey, <br/> Family Hardiness Index). A thematic analysis of the qualitative data was <br/> completed to identify patterns of family management of the genetic <br/> condition, and a cluster analysis of the quantitative data was completed <br/> to identify patterns of family functioning. Each parent was categorized <br/> into a family management style based on the qualitative analysis. For the <br/> cluster analysis, scores from the structured measures were used to <br/> identify distinct patterns of family functioning. Final typology <br/> development, which is in progress, will entail the identification of <br/> individual family patterns based on parents' management style and cluster <br/> analysis categorization followed by comparison across families to identify <br/> distinct family management-functioning types. Results of the analysis will <br/> be discussed in terms of traditional approaches to typology development <br/> and the contribution of mixed method analyses to a more sophisticated <br/> understanding of family functioning in the context of childhood chronic <br/> illness.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:52:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:52:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.