2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160364
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hospital Work Environment
Abstract:
Hospital Work Environment
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Blegen, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Health Science Center
Title:Professor & Associate Dean
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 4200 East 9th Avenue, C288-04, Denver, CO, 80262, USA
Contact Telephone:303.315.4237
As the health care industry moves again into a nursing shortage that could produce a major crisis in the near future, there is growing interest in the work environment and in understanding what factors attract people to or keep them in nursing careers. The purpose of this study was to describe nurses' perceptions of their work environment, job satisfaction, commitment to their jobs and careers, and to relate these perceptions to unit working conditions. A questionnaire was developed with multi-item measures of (a) workload, (b) equipment and supplies, (c) peer relations, (d) quality management, (e) commitment to the job, (f) commitment to nursing as a career, and (f) job satisfaction. Scores reported for the work environment subscales ranged from 1 to 5 (least to most positive). Data were also obtained describing the nursing workload (hours of care per patient day) for the units on which the sample nurses worked. Data were obtained from 227 RNs working on 27 adult units in 10 hospitals. Inter-item consistency reliability for the subscales ranged between .63 and .86. Nurses perceived that peer relations was the most positive aspect of their work environment (4.10) and the workload as the least positive (2.57). Job satisfaction was rated 3.62, commitment to the job at 3.43 and to the career at 3.46. Age and experience of the RNs were not related to their job satisfaction or perceptions of the environment. Nurses with baccalaureate or higher degrees perceived their work load more positively (2.8, 2.4) and were more satisfied with their jobs (3.7, 3.5) than nurses without baccalaureate degrees. Working on a unit with higher RN hours per patient day was associated with more positive perceptions of workload but was not associated with other aspects of the work environment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHospital Work Environmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160364-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hospital Work Environment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Blegen, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Health Science Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 4200 East 9th Avenue, C288-04, Denver, CO, 80262, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303.315.4237</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Mary.Blegen@UCHSC.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As the health care industry moves again into a nursing shortage that could produce a major crisis in the near future, there is growing interest in the work environment and in understanding what factors attract people to or keep them in nursing careers. The purpose of this study was to describe nurses' perceptions of their work environment, job satisfaction, commitment to their jobs and careers, and to relate these perceptions to unit working conditions. A questionnaire was developed with multi-item measures of (a) workload, (b) equipment and supplies, (c) peer relations, (d) quality management, (e) commitment to the job, (f) commitment to nursing as a career, and (f) job satisfaction. Scores reported for the work environment subscales ranged from 1 to 5 (least to most positive). Data were also obtained describing the nursing workload (hours of care per patient day) for the units on which the sample nurses worked. Data were obtained from 227 RNs working on 27 adult units in 10 hospitals. Inter-item consistency reliability for the subscales ranged between .63 and .86. Nurses perceived that peer relations was the most positive aspect of their work environment (4.10) and the workload as the least positive (2.57). Job satisfaction was rated 3.62, commitment to the job at 3.43 and to the career at 3.46. Age and experience of the RNs were not related to their job satisfaction or perceptions of the environment. Nurses with baccalaureate or higher degrees perceived their work load more positively (2.8, 2.4) and were more satisfied with their jobs (3.7, 3.5) than nurses without baccalaureate degrees. Working on a unit with higher RN hours per patient day was associated with more positive perceptions of workload but was not associated with other aspects of the work environment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:52:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:52:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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