2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160367
Type:
Presentation
Title:
One Hundred Years of Nursing Patients with Breast Cancer: 1850 to 1950
Abstract:
One Hundred Years of Nursing Patients with Breast Cancer: 1850 to 1950
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Lusk, Brigid
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Illinois University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1240 Normal Road NS 190C, DeKalb, IL, 60115-2894, USA
Contact Telephone:815.753.0663
Cancer was considered a woman's disease in the nineteenth and early twentieth century, and cases of breast cancer have been particularly well documented. While mastectomies offered hope of a cure, before the mid-nineteenth century innovations of anesthesia and antisepsis women were likely to die of shock or sepsis even if the cancer was eradicated. With post-anesthesia surgical daring and wider medical knowledge, particularly following the discovery of radium and X Rays, nurses developed specialized cancer nursing knowledge as well as giving generalized nursing care for these very ill women. Using nursing textbooks and articles from the period, as well as secondary sources, this historical research examines the nurses' role in caring for women with breast cancer from 1850 to 1950. Cancer was naturally regarded with great fear during this period and euphemisms were used to mask the real impact of the word cancer, with patients rarely being told they had the disease. Nursing journals reminded nurses of their role in promoting the early detection of cancer and getting patients to apply for treatment expeditiously. As trained women entering patients' homes, they were often the first person to whom patients and their families turned for advice. However, physicians deemed that nurses were not to be experts in the disease and nurses were advised against extensive study. As nurses, both in hospitals and private homes, these women witnessed stages of the disease rarely encountered today-large, fungating, strongly malodorous tumors. They dressed these growths, applied plasters to debride them, gave medications for pain, cared for women with radium breast implants, and attempted to give the patient hope. This study describes the emergence of cancer nursing as a specialized field, while demonstrating the significant body of nursing knowledge evident during this period.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOne Hundred Years of Nursing Patients with Breast Cancer: 1850 to 1950en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160367-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">One Hundred Years of Nursing Patients with Breast Cancer: 1850 to 1950</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lusk, Brigid</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Illinois University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1240 Normal Road NS 190C, DeKalb, IL, 60115-2894, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">815.753.0663</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">r60bml1@wpo.cso.niu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cancer was considered a woman's disease in the nineteenth and early twentieth century, and cases of breast cancer have been particularly well documented. While mastectomies offered hope of a cure, before the mid-nineteenth century innovations of anesthesia and antisepsis women were likely to die of shock or sepsis even if the cancer was eradicated. With post-anesthesia surgical daring and wider medical knowledge, particularly following the discovery of radium and X Rays, nurses developed specialized cancer nursing knowledge as well as giving generalized nursing care for these very ill women. Using nursing textbooks and articles from the period, as well as secondary sources, this historical research examines the nurses' role in caring for women with breast cancer from 1850 to 1950. Cancer was naturally regarded with great fear during this period and euphemisms were used to mask the real impact of the word cancer, with patients rarely being told they had the disease. Nursing journals reminded nurses of their role in promoting the early detection of cancer and getting patients to apply for treatment expeditiously. As trained women entering patients' homes, they were often the first person to whom patients and their families turned for advice. However, physicians deemed that nurses were not to be experts in the disease and nurses were advised against extensive study. As nurses, both in hospitals and private homes, these women witnessed stages of the disease rarely encountered today-large, fungating, strongly malodorous tumors. They dressed these growths, applied plasters to debride them, gave medications for pain, cared for women with radium breast implants, and attempted to give the patient hope. This study describes the emergence of cancer nursing as a specialized field, while demonstrating the significant body of nursing knowledge evident during this period.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:52:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:52:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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