2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160375
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Characteristics and Initiation of Prenatal Car
Abstract:
Characteristics and Initiation of Prenatal Car
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Abu-Baker, Nesrin
Contact Address:2929 Scioto, Apartment 600, Cincinnati, OH, 45219, USA
Background and significance: One of the healthy people 2010 objectives is to increase the proportion of pregnant women who receive early and adequate prenatal care (CDC, 2002). Golenberg, Patterson, and Freese, (1992) found that mothers who are young, poor, unmarried, and have low levels of education are at greatest risk of late or otherwise inadequate prenatal care. It is not known if race, age, and educational level also effect early initiation of prenatal care among Hamilton County women. Purpose: The purpose of this population-based epidemiological study was to validate previous research to inform an intervention study aimed at improving initiation of early prenatal care and neonatal outcomes in a population of young, low-income women in Hamilton County, Ohio. Method: A secondary data analysis was performed using data from birth certificates from infants of mothers giving birth in Hamilton Co. during 1999. Comparisons were done between initiation of prenatal care during the first trimester of pregnancy based on race or ethnicity, age, and educational level. Results: The rate of initiating first trimester care was significantly higher among non-Hispanic White mothers compared to the rate of Black mothers (95% CI=1.1-1.2), significantly higher among mothers with higher level of education compared to the rate of mothers with lower level of education in both races, and significantly higher among mothers aged 26 to 34 years compared to the rate of teenage mothers in both races. Conclusion: The effect of demographic maternal characteristics on initiation of prenatal care among Hamilton County pregnant women is consistent with the previous research. In developing our intervention study, we will target the women who exhibit characteristics known to effect to initiation of late prenatal care for the purpose of improving their initiation of early prenatal care, and thus, neonatal outcomes. AN: MN030028
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharacteristics and Initiation of Prenatal Caren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160375-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Characteristics and Initiation of Prenatal Car</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Abu-Baker, Nesrin</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2929 Scioto, Apartment 600, Cincinnati, OH, 45219, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and significance: One of the healthy people 2010 objectives is to increase the proportion of pregnant women who receive early and adequate prenatal care (CDC, 2002). Golenberg, Patterson, and Freese, (1992) found that mothers who are young, poor, unmarried, and have low levels of education are at greatest risk of late or otherwise inadequate prenatal care. It is not known if race, age, and educational level also effect early initiation of prenatal care among Hamilton County women. Purpose: The purpose of this population-based epidemiological study was to validate previous research to inform an intervention study aimed at improving initiation of early prenatal care and neonatal outcomes in a population of young, low-income women in Hamilton County, Ohio. Method: A secondary data analysis was performed using data from birth certificates from infants of mothers giving birth in Hamilton Co. during 1999. Comparisons were done between initiation of prenatal care during the first trimester of pregnancy based on race or ethnicity, age, and educational level. Results: The rate of initiating first trimester care was significantly higher among non-Hispanic White mothers compared to the rate of Black mothers (95% CI=1.1-1.2), significantly higher among mothers with higher level of education compared to the rate of mothers with lower level of education in both races, and significantly higher among mothers aged 26 to 34 years compared to the rate of teenage mothers in both races. Conclusion: The effect of demographic maternal characteristics on initiation of prenatal care among Hamilton County pregnant women is consistent with the previous research. In developing our intervention study, we will target the women who exhibit characteristics known to effect to initiation of late prenatal care for the purpose of improving their initiation of early prenatal care, and thus, neonatal outcomes. AN: MN030028 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:53:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:53:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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