2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160376
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of Videotape for Tai Chi in Elders
Abstract:
Use of Videotape for Tai Chi in Elders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Adler, Patricia
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Co-Authors:Beverly L. Roberts
Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the usefulness of a videotape on Tai Chi movements to assist home practice by elders. Theoretical/conceptual framework: Adult Learning Theory. Subjects: Fourteen (men=1, women=13) community-dwelling Tai Chi practitioners (³ 65 years) who completed an 8-week, 1-hour, Tai Chi class comprised 2 focus groups, including 8 and 6 participants each. Method: Participants viewed a videotape and responded to an interview guide of open-ended questions. In a 14-minute videotape, the investigator demonstrated Tai Chi warm-up exercises and the first circle of the Wu-style long form. Participants described the most and least difficult Tai Chi movements and offered suggestions for videotape improvement, in addition to their general difficulty of performing all movements on a scale of 0 (not difficult) to 10 (very difficult). Results: The average difficulty of performing the Tai Chi exercises was 3 (range 0-6). Six movements were identified by participants as the most difficult. Spine goes up and down was described by 6 participants (42.9%) as the most difficult movement, followed by 2 hands hold the feet (n=2, 14.3%), bend the bow and shoot the eagle (n=2, 14.3%), brush knee (n=2, 14.3%), repulse monkey (n=1, 7.1%), and kick leg (n=1, 7.1%). Three movements were identified as the easiest, including the closing movement (n=12, 85.7%), seven star (n=1, 7.1%), and look at back heel (n=1, 7.1%). Participants stated that using a second view to demonstrate the movements was helpful. Suggestions were made to improve the audio instruction of the videotape. Conclusions: Tai Chi has a low-moderate degree of difficulty for elders. Movements displayed in multiple angles have more potential to be effective for home practice. These data will be used to revise the videotape for a test of Tai Chi and pain in elders. AN: MN030370
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of Videotape for Tai Chi in Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160376-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of Videotape for Tai Chi in Elders </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Adler, Patricia</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Beverly L. Roberts</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the usefulness of a videotape on Tai Chi movements to assist home practice by elders. Theoretical/conceptual framework: Adult Learning Theory. Subjects: Fourteen (men=1, women=13) community-dwelling Tai Chi practitioners (&sup3; 65 years) who completed an 8-week, 1-hour, Tai Chi class comprised 2 focus groups, including 8 and 6 participants each. Method: Participants viewed a videotape and responded to an interview guide of open-ended questions. In a 14-minute videotape, the investigator demonstrated Tai Chi warm-up exercises and the first circle of the Wu-style long form. Participants described the most and least difficult Tai Chi movements and offered suggestions for videotape improvement, in addition to their general difficulty of performing all movements on a scale of 0 (not difficult) to 10 (very difficult). Results: The average difficulty of performing the Tai Chi exercises was 3 (range 0-6). Six movements were identified by participants as the most difficult. Spine goes up and down was described by 6 participants (42.9%) as the most difficult movement, followed by 2 hands hold the feet (n=2, 14.3%), bend the bow and shoot the eagle (n=2, 14.3%), brush knee (n=2, 14.3%), repulse monkey (n=1, 7.1%), and kick leg (n=1, 7.1%). Three movements were identified as the easiest, including the closing movement (n=12, 85.7%), seven star (n=1, 7.1%), and look at back heel (n=1, 7.1%). Participants stated that using a second view to demonstrate the movements was helpful. Suggestions were made to improve the audio instruction of the videotape. Conclusions: Tai Chi has a low-moderate degree of difficulty for elders. Movements displayed in multiple angles have more potential to be effective for home practice. These data will be used to revise the videotape for a test of Tai Chi and pain in elders. AN: MN030370 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:53:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:53:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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