Scaling the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) Using the Rasch Measurement Model

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160377
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Scaling the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) Using the Rasch Measurement Model
Abstract:
Scaling the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) Using the Rasch Measurement Model
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Amarneh, Basil
Contact Address: 2920 Scioto Street, Apt. 600, Cincinnati, OH, 45219, USA
Co-Authors:Elizabeth Betemps
Coping defined as the cognitive and behavioral efforts used to mange external and/ or internal stressful demands that are appraised exceeding the resources of the person. Several measures, tools and approaches were developed to identify coping strategies in relation to stressors. Many of these measures suffer from a weakness in their psychometric properties. Coping Inventory for Stressful Situation (CISS) is a multidimensional inventory, used to assess coping in three dimensions (Task, Emotion, & Avoidance). However, the inventory lacks the strong psychometric properties (r. 0.44-0.70), as well as it is not scaled on interval scale (ordinal scale). The aim of this study: is to assess the validity of CISS using Rasch measurement methods. Rasch measurement requires assessment of the following properties of scales for construct validity: 1) category functioning, 2) dimensionality, & 3) generalizability. Students attending the College of Evening and Continuing Education were recruited as the target population for the study; 178 students returned their questionnaires, only 153 qualified for the study. Data was analyzed using the WINSTEPS program for Rasch measurement. The results of the study showed that the categories of the CISS are not well ordered. Dimensionality results indicate that largely there was a good item fit to the coping dimension, the item-inter-correlation ranged from 0.12 to 0.48. The principal component analysis for the residuals showed three sub-dimensions these sub-dimensions supported the CISS originally proposed dimensions (the emotional, task, and avoidance oriented coping) by Endler & Parker (1990a). The generalizability resulted in item separation of 6.16 and corresponding reliability of .97 indicating a good spread of items along the linear continuum of coping responses. Moreover, agreement and invariance on 11 items between the two gender groups exist. The 11 items reflected what might be considered a sequential process of coping. These sequences support Lazarus and Folkman’s stress model. AN: MN030320
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleScaling the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) Using the Rasch Measurement Modelen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160377-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Scaling the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) Using the Rasch Measurement Model </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Amarneh, Basil</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value"> 2920 Scioto Street, Apt. 600, Cincinnati, OH, 45219, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elizabeth Betemps</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Coping defined as the cognitive and behavioral efforts used to mange external and/ or internal stressful demands that are appraised exceeding the resources of the person. Several measures, tools and approaches were developed to identify coping strategies in relation to stressors. Many of these measures suffer from a weakness in their psychometric properties. Coping Inventory for Stressful Situation (CISS) is a multidimensional inventory, used to assess coping in three dimensions (Task, Emotion, &amp; Avoidance). However, the inventory lacks the strong psychometric properties (r. 0.44-0.70), as well as it is not scaled on interval scale (ordinal scale). The aim of this study: is to assess the validity of CISS using Rasch measurement methods. Rasch measurement requires assessment of the following properties of scales for construct validity: 1) category functioning, 2) dimensionality, &amp; 3) generalizability. Students attending the College of Evening and Continuing Education were recruited as the target population for the study; 178 students returned their questionnaires, only 153 qualified for the study. Data was analyzed using the WINSTEPS program for Rasch measurement. The results of the study showed that the categories of the CISS are not well ordered. Dimensionality results indicate that largely there was a good item fit to the coping dimension, the item-inter-correlation ranged from 0.12 to 0.48. The principal component analysis for the residuals showed three sub-dimensions these sub-dimensions supported the CISS originally proposed dimensions (the emotional, task, and avoidance oriented coping) by Endler &amp; Parker (1990a). The generalizability resulted in item separation of 6.16 and corresponding reliability of .97 indicating a good spread of items along the linear continuum of coping responses. Moreover, agreement and invariance on 11 items between the two gender groups exist. The 11 items reflected what might be considered a sequential process of coping. These sequences support Lazarus and Folkman&rsquo;s stress model. AN: MN030320</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:53:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:53:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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