Factors Affecting Postoperative Pain Relief in Patients Undergoing Colorectal and General Surgery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160380
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Affecting Postoperative Pain Relief in Patients Undergoing Colorectal and General Surgery
Abstract:
Factors Affecting Postoperative Pain Relief in Patients Undergoing Colorectal and General Surgery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Baird, Gayle
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 1216 Second Street S.WJO MN-90, Rochester, MN, 55902, USA
Co-Authors:Linda M. Herrick; Barbara Snyder; Diane Wrobleski
Purpose: The purpose was to identify the effects of demographic, intervention and other variables on pain intensity in patients undergoing colorectal, abdominal and general surgery. Conceptual Framework: Despite implementation of pain management guidelines, some patients experience high pain levels. The interactions between interventions and age, gender, prior medications, alcohol use, types of procedures (incision location and length) are not clear. Few models contain these variables important in the clinical setting. Subjects: This study included 200 patients (100 males, 100 females), ranging in age from 20-88 years. Surgical procedures included 46% undergoing bowel resections, 25% liver, spleen or pancreas surgery, and the remaining general surgery including thyroid and breast. Method: Patients were consented prior to this prospective medical record review and written survey. Data collected included demographics, type of and indication for surgery, admission medications, all pain-related interventions, pain intensities, and satisfaction. Results: While 75% of the patients reported levels less than 3 (0-10 scale), 25% reported levels of greater than 3. Multiple and logistic regression indicate that age is a significant variable with older patients reporting less pain. The type of surgical procedure was significant. Patients with thyroid surgery had higher pain intensities. Women demonstrated a non-significant trend having more pain. Morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) (n=143) was favored. Patients rarely maximized the PCA. Nearly 50% received NSAIDS, while 31% received ketorolac. Conclusions: Though patients were in control of the PCA, they did not use available medication. For those experiencing high pain levels, further encouragement and education is needed. Older patients required less medication without higher pain intensities. It is not clear whether narcotic metabolism is slowed or they have greater tolerance. The trend of gender differences suggests further research. While progress has been made, further study of patients with poor pain relief is needed. AN: MN030164
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Affecting Postoperative Pain Relief in Patients Undergoing Colorectal and General Surgeryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160380-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Affecting Postoperative Pain Relief in Patients Undergoing Colorectal and General Surgery </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baird, Gayle</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 1216 Second Street S.WJO MN-90, Rochester, MN, 55902, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda M. Herrick; Barbara Snyder; Diane Wrobleski </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose was to identify the effects of demographic, intervention and other variables on pain intensity in patients undergoing colorectal, abdominal and general surgery. Conceptual Framework: Despite implementation of pain management guidelines, some patients experience high pain levels. The interactions between interventions and age, gender, prior medications, alcohol use, types of procedures (incision location and length) are not clear. Few models contain these variables important in the clinical setting. Subjects: This study included 200 patients (100 males, 100 females), ranging in age from 20-88 years. Surgical procedures included 46% undergoing bowel resections, 25% liver, spleen or pancreas surgery, and the remaining general surgery including thyroid and breast. Method: Patients were consented prior to this prospective medical record review and written survey. Data collected included demographics, type of and indication for surgery, admission medications, all pain-related interventions, pain intensities, and satisfaction. Results: While 75% of the patients reported levels less than 3 (0-10 scale), 25% reported levels of greater than 3. Multiple and logistic regression indicate that age is a significant variable with older patients reporting less pain. The type of surgical procedure was significant. Patients with thyroid surgery had higher pain intensities. Women demonstrated a non-significant trend having more pain. Morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) (n=143) was favored. Patients rarely maximized the PCA. Nearly 50% received NSAIDS, while 31% received ketorolac. Conclusions: Though patients were in control of the PCA, they did not use available medication. For those experiencing high pain levels, further encouragement and education is needed. Older patients required less medication without higher pain intensities. It is not clear whether narcotic metabolism is slowed or they have greater tolerance. The trend of gender differences suggests further research. While progress has been made, further study of patients with poor pain relief is needed. AN: MN030164 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:53:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:53:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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