Beyond Community Health Assessment: Participatory Action Research in Community Health

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160381
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Beyond Community Health Assessment: Participatory Action Research in Community Health
Abstract:
Beyond Community Health Assessment: Participatory Action Research in Community Health
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Baisch, Mary
Contact Address:SON, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, 53211, USA
Co-Authors:Sharon L. Garrett; Nancy J. Kreuser; Sheryl Talcott Kelber
When the Institute of Medicine promoted assessment of the health of communities as a core function of public health, local health department staff across the country, primarily nurses, began assessments of their local constituencies. Although some states mandate these assessments, many vary in approach from community to community. The completed assessments are used to develop strategic plans for health improvement. Many of these plans are evidence of a national trend in which community health nurses collaborate with health researchers in a participatory action agenda. Over the past five years, two university-community partnerships developed that led to priority health planning and improvement projects in four communities. Community members and university researchers analyzed data collected through epidemiological reports, local survey data, and focus groups. The partners used the results to develop strategic plans for health improvement. The local communities then implemented the plans according to their defined priorities and available resources. The Community Health Assessment and Needs Assessment Survey (CHUNAS) developed by the researchers was revised to include more questions included in national health surveys and health needs specific to the local communities, one suburban and one rural/suburban. The revised instrument was mailed to community members and results were compared with available local census data, morbidity, and mortality reports, and health utilization data. Focus groups were held broadening the assessment to include marginalized groups. The completed community health assessments included information about the four communities served by these two local public health departments. The participatory action research process will be presented using the Kemmes and McTaggart (2000) criteria. Key findings and the process for developing the community-university collaboration, prioritization of local health concerns, development of strategic health plans for the local communities, and the resulting health improvement programs will be described. AN: MN030094
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBeyond Community Health Assessment: Participatory Action Research in Community Healthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160381-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Beyond Community Health Assessment: Participatory Action Research in Community Health </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baisch, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, 53211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sharon L. Garrett; Nancy J. Kreuser; Sheryl Talcott Kelber</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">When the Institute of Medicine promoted assessment of the health of communities as a core function of public health, local health department staff across the country, primarily nurses, began assessments of their local constituencies. Although some states mandate these assessments, many vary in approach from community to community. The completed assessments are used to develop strategic plans for health improvement. Many of these plans are evidence of a national trend in which community health nurses collaborate with health researchers in a participatory action agenda. Over the past five years, two university-community partnerships developed that led to priority health planning and improvement projects in four communities. Community members and university researchers analyzed data collected through epidemiological reports, local survey data, and focus groups. The partners used the results to develop strategic plans for health improvement. The local communities then implemented the plans according to their defined priorities and available resources. The Community Health Assessment and Needs Assessment Survey (CHUNAS) developed by the researchers was revised to include more questions included in national health surveys and health needs specific to the local communities, one suburban and one rural/suburban. The revised instrument was mailed to community members and results were compared with available local census data, morbidity, and mortality reports, and health utilization data. Focus groups were held broadening the assessment to include marginalized groups. The completed community health assessments included information about the four communities served by these two local public health departments. The participatory action research process will be presented using the Kemmes and McTaggart (2000) criteria. Key findings and the process for developing the community-university collaboration, prioritization of local health concerns, development of strategic health plans for the local communities, and the resulting health improvement programs will be described. AN: MN030094</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:53:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:53:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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