Effect of Distractive Auditory Stimuli in Persons with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160386
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Distractive Auditory Stimuli in Persons with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Abstract:
Effect of Distractive Auditory Stimuli in Persons with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Bauldoff, Gerene
Contact Address:CON, 585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Co-Authors:Leslie A. Hoffman
Dyspnea is a complex phenomena and the primary disabling symptom in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Distractive auditory stimuli (DAS) may reduce dyspnea perception, thereby promoting increased exercise tolerance. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a home-based exercise program which used DAS on dyspnea, functional performance, depressive symptoms, anxiety, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), global quality of life (QoL) and symptoms of breathlessness and fatigue during training in patients with moderate to severe COPD (FEV1 < 60% predicted). Adherence to the walking program was also described. Twenty-four subjects (4 male, 20 female) with moderate-to-severe COPD (FEV1 % predicted 41.3 + 13.0%) were randomized into either the DAS (n=12) or control group (n=12). The DAS group was instructed to use a walkman-type cassette player and music tapes as distraction during independent walking. Significant multivariate differences were noted over time (p=0.037) and interaction of time and group (p=0.004). Significant interaction of time and group was seen for dyspnea (p=0.004) with the DAS group reporting less perceptions of dyspnea and functional performance as measured by the 6MW (p=0.004).The DAS group increased the 6MW distance 445 feet from baseline to 8 weeks while the control group decreased the distance by 169 feet. Depressive symptoms revealed a significant difference over time (p=0.015) but no interaction (p=0.568). No significant differences were noted between groups, over time or interaction of group and time for anxiety, global QoL, HRQoL or symptoms during training. All completed exercise logs. The total distance walked was 24%> in DAS group vs. control group. Increased walking velocity by the DAS group may have promoted the training effect. These findings support the effect of DAS on independent walking on dyspnea and functional performance. AN: MN030139
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Distractive Auditory Stimuli in Persons with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160386-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Distractive Auditory Stimuli in Persons with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bauldoff, Gerene</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Leslie A. Hoffman</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Dyspnea is a complex phenomena and the primary disabling symptom in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Distractive auditory stimuli (DAS) may reduce dyspnea perception, thereby promoting increased exercise tolerance. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a home-based exercise program which used DAS on dyspnea, functional performance, depressive symptoms, anxiety, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), global quality of life (QoL) and symptoms of breathlessness and fatigue during training in patients with moderate to severe COPD (FEV1 &lt; 60% predicted). Adherence to the walking program was also described. Twenty-four subjects (4 male, 20 female) with moderate-to-severe COPD (FEV1 % predicted 41.3 + 13.0%) were randomized into either the DAS (n=12) or control group (n=12). The DAS group was instructed to use a walkman-type cassette player and music tapes as distraction during independent walking. Significant multivariate differences were noted over time (p=0.037) and interaction of time and group (p=0.004). Significant interaction of time and group was seen for dyspnea (p=0.004) with the DAS group reporting less perceptions of dyspnea and functional performance as measured by the 6MW (p=0.004).The DAS group increased the 6MW distance 445 feet from baseline to 8 weeks while the control group decreased the distance by 169 feet. Depressive symptoms revealed a significant difference over time (p=0.015) but no interaction (p=0.568). No significant differences were noted between groups, over time or interaction of group and time for anxiety, global QoL, HRQoL or symptoms during training. All completed exercise logs. The total distance walked was 24%&gt; in DAS group vs. control group. Increased walking velocity by the DAS group may have promoted the training effect. These findings support the effect of DAS on independent walking on dyspnea and functional performance. AN: MN030139 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:53:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:53:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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