2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160389
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social Support for Tobacco Dependence: Pilot Study Results
Abstract:
Social Support for Tobacco Dependence: Pilot Study Results
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Buchanan, Lynne
Contact Address:CON, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
The purpose of this pilot study was to develop an intervention utilizing nicotine replacement (NRT) and social support to help patients quit smoking. The specific aims were: 1) develop and evaluate the intervention; 2) examine feasibility of the methods, 3) report effect size. The conceptual model used was a health promotion model and social cognitive theory. Outcomes included quit and relapse rates and intermediate variables of self-efficacy, nicotine dependence, depression, and partner support. The design was quasi-experimental with random assignment to standard care group (who received a 30-minute on-site intervention) or to standard care plus social support who received on-site visits plus 6 wk, intermittent telephone intervention. Data was collected at baseline, 6 wks, 3 and 6 months. Data was collected on demographics, smoking behavior, self-efficacy, nicotine dependence, depression, and partner interaction. 60 patients were referred over 10 months and 42 met criteria. 18 were in standard care and 24 were in standard care plus social support. The sample mean age was 46 yrs. (+-38), 27 female and 15 male, married or partnered, employed, with HS education. Mean number yrs. smoked was 28.8 (+-11.7), mean age started smoking was 15.8 (+-4.2), mean number smoked/day was 29.9 (+-13.7) and nicotine dependence mean score was 7.8 (+-3.2). Top medical diagnoses were cardiac, depression, respiratory, and diabetes. Instruments took 1 hour to complete. Barriers included no transportation and stress; subjects who failed to quit were more likely to drop out. Effect size (repeated measures ANOVA) was small and power analysis showed sample size of 120/group. Quit rate (percentage) for standard care plus social support was twice as high at 6 wks compared to standard group. Standard care plus social support had higher positive to negative partner interaction ratio. Including methods to increase self-efficacy such as tailored messages and motivational interviewing would enhance future studies. This pilot study demonstrates feasibility of the methods and effect size for a future study. AN: MN030332
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial Support for Tobacco Dependence: Pilot Study Resultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160389-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Social Support for Tobacco Dependence: Pilot Study Results </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Buchanan, Lynne</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this pilot study was to develop an intervention utilizing nicotine replacement (NRT) and social support to help patients quit smoking. The specific aims were: 1) develop and evaluate the intervention; 2) examine feasibility of the methods, 3) report effect size. The conceptual model used was a health promotion model and social cognitive theory. Outcomes included quit and relapse rates and intermediate variables of self-efficacy, nicotine dependence, depression, and partner support. The design was quasi-experimental with random assignment to standard care group (who received a 30-minute on-site intervention) or to standard care plus social support who received on-site visits plus 6 wk, intermittent telephone intervention. Data was collected at baseline, 6 wks, 3 and 6 months. Data was collected on demographics, smoking behavior, self-efficacy, nicotine dependence, depression, and partner interaction. 60 patients were referred over 10 months and 42 met criteria. 18 were in standard care and 24 were in standard care plus social support. The sample mean age was 46 yrs. (+-38), 27 female and 15 male, married or partnered, employed, with HS education. Mean number yrs. smoked was 28.8 (+-11.7), mean age started smoking was 15.8 (+-4.2), mean number smoked/day was 29.9 (+-13.7) and nicotine dependence mean score was 7.8 (+-3.2). Top medical diagnoses were cardiac, depression, respiratory, and diabetes. Instruments took 1 hour to complete. Barriers included no transportation and stress; subjects who failed to quit were more likely to drop out. Effect size (repeated measures ANOVA) was small and power analysis showed sample size of 120/group. Quit rate (percentage) for standard care plus social support was twice as high at 6 wks compared to standard group. Standard care plus social support had higher positive to negative partner interaction ratio. Including methods to increase self-efficacy such as tailored messages and motivational interviewing would enhance future studies. This pilot study demonstrates feasibility of the methods and effect size for a future study. AN: MN030332 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:53:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:53:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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