2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160391
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Challenge: Care of Childbearing Adolescents
Abstract:
Nursing Challenge: Care of Childbearing Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Cassata, Linda
Contact Address:Maternal Child Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612-7350, USA
A focus group study was conducted with the specific purpose of describing nurses’ attitudes regarding the challenges, barriers and opportunities of providing care to low-income pregnant adolescents. This presentation focuses only on the challenges identified by 24 registered nurses in a large Midwestern city who care for low-income African-American and Hispanic childbearing adolescents during the labor, delivery and postpartum periods. Pregnant adolescents disproportionately come from lower-income homes and are more likely to be African-American or Hispanic. Scientific literature is replete with research focusing on the associated risks and health outcomes for young women of color and their children, but very little research has been conducted that describes the impact of nurses’ attitudes on practice outcomes. Health disparities among diverse populations are receiving growing attention and are a major priority for Healthy People 2010. The impact of attitudes and beliefs of health providers on patient outcomes is just beginning to emerge. The findings of this study suggest that while the predictable challenges of time constraint, work overload and limited resources were recurrent themes, the challenge most commonly expressed centered on cultural difference and conflict. Nurses expressed a lack of preparedness in dealing with what they considered sensitive health education topics in an effort to avoid racial/ethnic stereotyping and to demonstrate respect to the adolescent. Nurses struggled because their education did not provide appropriate communications skills or a framework to explain family dynamics among African-American and Hispanic cultures, thus limiting their ability to care for diverse families. This study revealed the need for ongoing cultural competence education after graduation as well as a call to examine nursing education’s role in preparing nurses to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate health services as recommended by JCAHO (Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations). AN: MN030236
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Challenge: Care of Childbearing Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160391-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Challenge: Care of Childbearing Adolescents </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cassata, Linda</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Maternal Child Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612-7350, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A focus group study was conducted with the specific purpose of describing nurses&rsquo; attitudes regarding the challenges, barriers and opportunities of providing care to low-income pregnant adolescents. This presentation focuses only on the challenges identified by 24 registered nurses in a large Midwestern city who care for low-income African-American and Hispanic childbearing adolescents during the labor, delivery and postpartum periods. Pregnant adolescents disproportionately come from lower-income homes and are more likely to be African-American or Hispanic. Scientific literature is replete with research focusing on the associated risks and health outcomes for young women of color and their children, but very little research has been conducted that describes the impact of nurses&rsquo; attitudes on practice outcomes. Health disparities among diverse populations are receiving growing attention and are a major priority for Healthy People 2010. The impact of attitudes and beliefs of health providers on patient outcomes is just beginning to emerge. The findings of this study suggest that while the predictable challenges of time constraint, work overload and limited resources were recurrent themes, the challenge most commonly expressed centered on cultural difference and conflict. Nurses expressed a lack of preparedness in dealing with what they considered sensitive health education topics in an effort to avoid racial/ethnic stereotyping and to demonstrate respect to the adolescent. Nurses struggled because their education did not provide appropriate communications skills or a framework to explain family dynamics among African-American and Hispanic cultures, thus limiting their ability to care for diverse families. This study revealed the need for ongoing cultural competence education after graduation as well as a call to examine nursing education&rsquo;s role in preparing nurses to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate health services as recommended by JCAHO (Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations). AN: MN030236 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:53:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:53:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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