Relationships of Cigarette Smoking, an Acute Phase Protein, and Prolactin to Subsequent Development of Rheumatoid Arthritis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160392
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationships of Cigarette Smoking, an Acute Phase Protein, and Prolactin to Subsequent Development of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Abstract:
Relationships of Cigarette Smoking, an Acute Phase Protein, and Prolactin to Subsequent Development of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Cooling, Melinda
Contact Address:One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL, 61615, USA
Co-Authors:Kathleen Baldwin; Alfonse T. Masi; Jean Aldag
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects 2.1 million adults in the United States. Research has shown that heavy cigarette smoking impacts development of RA. Recently, associations between RA and acute phase proteins and prolactin levels have been hypothesized. The purpose of this research was to examine the relationships at baseline between cigarette smoking, the acute phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP), prolactin and subsequent development of RA. This study employed a secondary analysis of selected data from the Rheumatoid Arthritis Precursors Study (1974-1994) database, a community-based, prospective study. Female (N=18) (postmenopausal, to minimize hormonal cycling) and male (N=17) pre-RA cases were selected from all cases identified at baseline with data on cigarette smoking, CRP, and prolactin. Cohort cases who subsequently developed RA were matched with controls at a 1:4 ratio, on age, and sex (all Caucasian). Among the women, heavy smokers (30+ cigarettes/day) were at increased risk of developing RA (OR 6.70; 95%: 1.03, 43.68). Heavy smoking among the males did not significantly increase the risk of developing RA (OR 2.70; 95%: 0.87, 8.36), although the proportion of smokers among cases (42%) was twice that among controls (21%). The association of smoking with CRP was significant only among males without RA. Among males, smoking was associated with significantly lower levels of prolactin (cases: rho=-0.54, p=0.03; controls: rho=-0.42, p<0.01). This relationship was not significant in either group of females, but differed significantly between genders (p<0.01). This study provides further evidence of the behavioral risks of developing RA among postmenopausal females who were heavy smokers. The significant differential associations between genders in cigarette smoking, CRP, and prolactin warrant further study. Understanding the role of cigarette smoking in relation to development of RA is essential for risk modification, early diagnosis, and treatment to limit the extent of RA disease. AN: MN030041
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationships of Cigarette Smoking, an Acute Phase Protein, and Prolactin to Subsequent Development of Rheumatoid Arthritisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160392-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationships of Cigarette Smoking, an Acute Phase Protein, and Prolactin to Subsequent Development of Rheumatoid Arthritis </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cooling, Melinda</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL, 61615, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathleen Baldwin; Alfonse T. Masi; Jean Aldag</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects 2.1 million adults in the United States. Research has shown that heavy cigarette smoking impacts development of RA. Recently, associations between RA and acute phase proteins and prolactin levels have been hypothesized. The purpose of this research was to examine the relationships at baseline between cigarette smoking, the acute phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP), prolactin and subsequent development of RA. This study employed a secondary analysis of selected data from the Rheumatoid Arthritis Precursors Study (1974-1994) database, a community-based, prospective study. Female (N=18) (postmenopausal, to minimize hormonal cycling) and male (N=17) pre-RA cases were selected from all cases identified at baseline with data on cigarette smoking, CRP, and prolactin. Cohort cases who subsequently developed RA were matched with controls at a 1:4 ratio, on age, and sex (all Caucasian). Among the women, heavy smokers (30+ cigarettes/day) were at increased risk of developing RA (OR 6.70; 95%: 1.03, 43.68). Heavy smoking among the males did not significantly increase the risk of developing RA (OR 2.70; 95%: 0.87, 8.36), although the proportion of smokers among cases (42%) was twice that among controls (21%). The association of smoking with CRP was significant only among males without RA. Among males, smoking was associated with significantly lower levels of prolactin (cases: rho=-0.54, p=0.03; controls: rho=-0.42, p&lt;0.01). This relationship was not significant in either group of females, but differed significantly between genders (p&lt;0.01). This study provides further evidence of the behavioral risks of developing RA among postmenopausal females who were heavy smokers. The significant differential associations between genders in cigarette smoking, CRP, and prolactin warrant further study. Understanding the role of cigarette smoking in relation to development of RA is essential for risk modification, early diagnosis, and treatment to limit the extent of RA disease. AN: MN030041 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:53:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:53:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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