2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160394
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hydration Indicators and Confusion Risk in Elders
Abstract:
Hydration Indicators and Confusion Risk in Elders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Culp, Kenneth
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Contact Address:CON, Adult and Gerontology, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Co-Authors:Mary Dyck; Pamela Z Cacchione; Bonnie Wakefield; Joan Laing
Some elders struggle to maintain adequate hydration due to a disparity between diminished thirst and the physiological need for fluid balance. This is especially true in frail elders who reside in long-term care (LTC) facilities. The purpose of this study was to analyze hydration indicators as potential risk variables factors for acute confusion (AC). We used serum electrolytes, bioimpedance analysis (BIA), and photometric urinalysis in our instrumentation for hydration indicators. The sample (n=168) consisted of 128 women (76.2%) and 40 men (23.8%) from 13 LTC facilities in rural SE Iowa randomly sampled by county. There were 51 (31%) AC cases based on the NEECHAM scoring technique. Twenty-seven (16.1%) subjects were formally diagnosed with dementia. Baseline MMSE scores were significantly lower (t=-6.8, p < .001) for AC cases (mean=17.9, SD=5.9), compared to non-cases (mean=23.6, SD=4.8). AC cases were more likely to have higher baseline BUN values (=25.1 mg/dL, SD=14.1) than non-cases (mean=23.8 mg/dL, SD=11.6), although this was not statistically significant. Serum sodium levels at baseline were also slightly higher in cases (mean=139.1 mEq/L, SD=3.3) compared to non-cases (mean=138.8 mEq/L, SD=3.3). AC cases demonstrated lower % body weight ICF (mean=47.7%, SD=4.0) versus that of non-cases (mean=48.5%, SD 4.6). TBW and ECF were similar for AC cases and non-cases. Urine color ratings were slightly darker for AC cases (mean=3.31 SD=1.78) than non-cases (mean=3.25, SD=1.75), however this was not statistically significant. This study suggests that some hydration measures may be more sensitive than others for assessing AC risk in this population. AN: MN030192
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHydration Indicators and Confusion Risk in Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160394-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hydration Indicators and Confusion Risk in Elders </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Culp, Kenneth</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, Adult and Gerontology, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Dyck; Pamela Z Cacchione; Bonnie Wakefield; Joan Laing </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Some elders struggle to maintain adequate hydration due to a disparity between diminished thirst and the physiological need for fluid balance. This is especially true in frail elders who reside in long-term care (LTC) facilities. The purpose of this study was to analyze hydration indicators as potential risk variables factors for acute confusion (AC). We used serum electrolytes, bioimpedance analysis (BIA), and photometric urinalysis in our instrumentation for hydration indicators. The sample (n=168) consisted of 128 women (76.2%) and 40 men (23.8%) from 13 LTC facilities in rural SE Iowa randomly sampled by county. There were 51 (31%) AC cases based on the NEECHAM scoring technique. Twenty-seven (16.1%) subjects were formally diagnosed with dementia. Baseline MMSE scores were significantly lower (t=-6.8, p &lt; .001) for AC cases (mean=17.9, SD=5.9), compared to non-cases (mean=23.6, SD=4.8). AC cases were more likely to have higher baseline BUN values (=25.1 mg/dL, SD=14.1) than non-cases (mean=23.8 mg/dL, SD=11.6), although this was not statistically significant. Serum sodium levels at baseline were also slightly higher in cases (mean=139.1 mEq/L, SD=3.3) compared to non-cases (mean=138.8 mEq/L, SD=3.3). AC cases demonstrated lower % body weight ICF (mean=47.7%, SD=4.0) versus that of non-cases (mean=48.5%, SD 4.6). TBW and ECF were similar for AC cases and non-cases. Urine color ratings were slightly darker for AC cases (mean=3.31 SD=1.78) than non-cases (mean=3.25, SD=1.75), however this was not statistically significant. This study suggests that some hydration measures may be more sensitive than others for assessing AC risk in this population. AN: MN030192 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:54:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:54:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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