2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160395
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implications from Research with Parents of African American Murder Victims
Abstract:
Implications from Research with Parents of African American Murder Victims
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Dannemiller, Christine
Contact Address:CON, 150 Concord Trail, Doylestown, OH, 44230, USA
The purpose of this study was to enhance the understanding of the bereavement response of African American parents who have lost a child to murder. Cultural differences affect the response to loss and it was imperative to discover the unique concerns of these parents and how they resolved them. Even though there is a greater likelihood that young, African Americans are more likely to be a victim of homicide than are their White counterparts, minimal research exists about the problems of these parents whose children are murdered. The framework of the study was grounded theory. The subjects included African American parents whose children had been murdered. In-depth interviews with these parents were the primary source of data. Constant comparison and analysis was the method of analysis. One conclusion from this study was that differences in the African American culture required some modification of previously successful strategies for the inclusion of parents of murder victims. Parents were initially invited to participate using a variety of strategies that had previously proven fruitful for engaging other parents of murdered children. The researcher’s prior experiences with recruiting participants for this sensitive area of inquiry provided the basis for this initial approach. Previously implemented strategies were revised to successfully engage, recruit, and retain potential participants. The results of the study were that parents identified a unique variable that impacted their response to loss. In addition, they confirmed the permeating effects of loss on their health. It is necessary that these parents be included in research studies so that health care providers who encounter them in a variety of settings have a sound scientific basis to provide appropriate care. Such care enables parents to implement health behaviors that promote their well-being. AN: MN030197
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplications from Research with Parents of African American Murder Victimsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160395-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Implications from Research with Parents of African American Murder Victims </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dannemiller, Christine</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 150 Concord Trail, Doylestown, OH, 44230, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to enhance the understanding of the bereavement response of African American parents who have lost a child to murder. Cultural differences affect the response to loss and it was imperative to discover the unique concerns of these parents and how they resolved them. Even though there is a greater likelihood that young, African Americans are more likely to be a victim of homicide than are their White counterparts, minimal research exists about the problems of these parents whose children are murdered. The framework of the study was grounded theory. The subjects included African American parents whose children had been murdered. In-depth interviews with these parents were the primary source of data. Constant comparison and analysis was the method of analysis. One conclusion from this study was that differences in the African American culture required some modification of previously successful strategies for the inclusion of parents of murder victims. Parents were initially invited to participate using a variety of strategies that had previously proven fruitful for engaging other parents of murdered children. The researcher&rsquo;s prior experiences with recruiting participants for this sensitive area of inquiry provided the basis for this initial approach. Previously implemented strategies were revised to successfully engage, recruit, and retain potential participants. The results of the study were that parents identified a unique variable that impacted their response to loss. In addition, they confirmed the permeating effects of loss on their health. It is necessary that these parents be included in research studies so that health care providers who encounter them in a variety of settings have a sound scientific basis to provide appropriate care. Such care enables parents to implement health behaviors that promote their well-being. AN: MN030197</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:54:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:54:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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