2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160396
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Age related physical endurance following fluid percussion injury in rats
Abstract:
Age related physical endurance following fluid percussion injury in rats
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Davis, Alice
Contact Address:Acute, Chronic and Long Term Care, 400 N. Ingalls, Rm 2180, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Illness or injury can drain physical reserve in older persons. In animal models, motor activity is a primary method for testing cognition and physical ability. Thus, physical endurance is a key variable in assessing injury related changes. In this descriptive/observational study animals were exercised three days after a fluid percussion injury (FPI) using a wheel task in order to describe and quantify physical limits of endurance. Injured animals were compared to non-injured animals across three age groups young (3 months), middle (15 months) and old (24 months). A wheel task requiring physical endurance and sensorimotor integration for successful completion was used. Minimally successful exercise test was defined as five minutes with 8 minutes considered maximum endurance. Duration of walk time and quality of walk (seamless vs interrupted) were recorded during timed laps. Injury magnitude was similar across age groups but highest in the oldest rats. Mean speed (sec/rev) was 7.48 for all animals. Young injured animals fell close to the mean at 7.5 with old injured and non-injured animals testing below the mean. Middle age injured animals tested 1.32 sec/rev above and their non-injured counterparts tested 1.38 sec/rev below the mean. Duration of exercise ranged from 70% completing an 8-minute walk (with or without interruption) compared to 25% completing only 5 minutes. Compared to old animals the middle age animals performed poorly; the majority completed only five minutes, two had interrupted laps, one failed to perform, and one had no interrupted laps. No animals demonstrated physical signs of fatigue during or after the endurance test. Animal models regardless of paradigm require physical activity testing. This study provides age related information on physical endurance following a FPI using a demanding sensorimotor task. AN: MN030078
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAge related physical endurance following fluid percussion injury in ratsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160396-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Age related physical endurance following fluid percussion injury in rats</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Davis, Alice</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Acute, Chronic and Long Term Care, 400 N. Ingalls, Rm 2180, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Illness or injury can drain physical reserve in older persons. In animal models, motor activity is a primary method for testing cognition and physical ability. Thus, physical endurance is a key variable in assessing injury related changes. In this descriptive/observational study animals were exercised three days after a fluid percussion injury (FPI) using a wheel task in order to describe and quantify physical limits of endurance. Injured animals were compared to non-injured animals across three age groups young (3 months), middle (15 months) and old (24 months). A wheel task requiring physical endurance and sensorimotor integration for successful completion was used. Minimally successful exercise test was defined as five minutes with 8 minutes considered maximum endurance. Duration of walk time and quality of walk (seamless vs interrupted) were recorded during timed laps. Injury magnitude was similar across age groups but highest in the oldest rats. Mean speed (sec/rev) was 7.48 for all animals. Young injured animals fell close to the mean at 7.5 with old injured and non-injured animals testing below the mean. Middle age injured animals tested 1.32 sec/rev above and their non-injured counterparts tested 1.38 sec/rev below the mean. Duration of exercise ranged from 70% completing an 8-minute walk (with or without interruption) compared to 25% completing only 5 minutes. Compared to old animals the middle age animals performed poorly; the majority completed only five minutes, two had interrupted laps, one failed to perform, and one had no interrupted laps. No animals demonstrated physical signs of fatigue during or after the endurance test. Animal models regardless of paradigm require physical activity testing. This study provides age related information on physical endurance following a FPI using a demanding sensorimotor task. AN: MN030078</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:54:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:54:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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