2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160398
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What Nurses Need to Stay in Practice
Abstract:
What Nurses Need to Stay in Practice
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Decker, Sally
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 7400 Bay Road, University Center, MI, 48710, USA
Co-Authors:Elizabeth A. Roe; Bonnie Harmer; Ester Bay; Carrie Rice Sauter
Retaining experienced nurses in the workplace is important in this time of nursing shortage. At the request of the Practice Cabinet of a state nurses association, interviews of 37 member nurses from a variety of practice settings were completed using a team of four experienced interviewers. Nurses were asked what they needed in order to stay in the workplace, keeping their patients and themselves safe. The Human Ecosystem perspective was used, probing for natural, human behavioral and human constructed environmental concerns. The tape recorded interviews were transcribed and content analysis was utilized. Coding categories were determined through several rounds of wild coding by each analysis team member followed by pattern coding and a consensus process. Team trials of the coding scheme for inclusiveness were followed by the writing of refined coding definitions. Each transcript was coded independently by at least two members of the data analysis team for intercoder reliability. Two interviews were used to developing a standard as per Weber. Coded data was then collapsed to reveal 1) the context of complexity – including communication with complex individuals and systems and complex human needs with aging (patients and nurses), and multiple patient problems 2) Emotion as Output and Feedback with nurses needing to feel respected by the organization, feel less stress and burnout, and feel more safe and 3) the system needs of: Professional, Culture of the Organization, Structure of the Organization and Physical. The metaphor of a geyser was used to depict these findings. Recommendations made by the nurses for changes to enable the release of the nursing power to care included a wide range of physical (lifting equipment, print size) structural (staffing, compensation) organizational culture (listening to nursing) and professional (political voice) ideas. AN: MN030384
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat Nurses Need to Stay in Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160398-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">What Nurses Need to Stay in Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Decker, Sally</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 7400 Bay Road, University Center, MI, 48710, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elizabeth A. Roe; Bonnie Harmer; Ester Bay; Carrie Rice Sauter </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Retaining experienced nurses in the workplace is important in this time of nursing shortage. At the request of the Practice Cabinet of a state nurses association, interviews of 37 member nurses from a variety of practice settings were completed using a team of four experienced interviewers. Nurses were asked what they needed in order to stay in the workplace, keeping their patients and themselves safe. The Human Ecosystem perspective was used, probing for natural, human behavioral and human constructed environmental concerns. The tape recorded interviews were transcribed and content analysis was utilized. Coding categories were determined through several rounds of wild coding by each analysis team member followed by pattern coding and a consensus process. Team trials of the coding scheme for inclusiveness were followed by the writing of refined coding definitions. Each transcript was coded independently by at least two members of the data analysis team for intercoder reliability. Two interviews were used to developing a standard as per Weber. Coded data was then collapsed to reveal 1) the context of complexity &ndash; including communication with complex individuals and systems and complex human needs with aging (patients and nurses), and multiple patient problems 2) Emotion as Output and Feedback with nurses needing to feel respected by the organization, feel less stress and burnout, and feel more safe and 3) the system needs of: Professional, Culture of the Organization, Structure of the Organization and Physical. The metaphor of a geyser was used to depict these findings. Recommendations made by the nurses for changes to enable the release of the nursing power to care included a wide range of physical (lifting equipment, print size) structural (staffing, compensation) organizational culture (listening to nursing) and professional (political voice) ideas. AN: MN030384 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:54:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:54:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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