2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160399
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Symptoms of Unstable Angina: Do Women and Men Differ?
Abstract:
The Symptoms of Unstable Angina: Do Women and Men Differ?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:DeVon, Holli
Contact Address:CON, Clark Hall, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA
Co-Authors:Julie Johnson Zerwic
Over 12 million Americans are currently living with coronary heart disease (CHD) and are at risk for an episode of unstable angina (UA) or myocardial infarction. Differences have been documented between women and men in the epidemiology, presentation, and outcomes of CHD. Despite these differences, it has been assumed that women and men experience the same symptoms during an episode of UA. The purpose of this study was to determine if there were gender differences in the symptoms of UA and if so, to determine if these differences remained after controlling for age, diabetes, anxiety, depression, and functional status. This descriptive study used a non-experimental, quantitative design. A convenience sample of 50 women and 50 men, hospitalized with unstable angina, were recruited from an urban and a suburban medical center. The Unstable Angina Symptoms Questionnaire (UASQ) was used to identify symptoms. Multivariate analysis indicated that women experienced significantly (p< 0.05) more shortness of breath (74% vs. 60%), weakness (74% vs. 48%), difficulty breathing (66% vs. 38%), nausea (42% vs. 22%), and loss of appetite (40% vs. 10%) than men. After controlling for age, diabetes, anxiety, depression, and functional status, women were still more likely than men to report weakness (p=0.03), difficulty breathing (p=0.02), nausea (p=0.03), and loss of appetite (p=0.02). Chi-square analysis of symptom descriptors revealed that women disclosed more (p<0.05) upper back pain (42% vs. 18%), stabbing pain (32% vs. 12%), and knifelike pain (28% vs. 12%). Findings suggest that women and men have similar symptoms during an episode of UA, however a higher proportion of women have less typical symptoms. Clinicians and patients should be aware of these differences to facilitate an accurate diagnosis and reduce time to treatment. AN: MN030357
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Symptoms of Unstable Angina: Do Women and Men Differ?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160399-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Symptoms of Unstable Angina: Do Women and Men Differ? </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">DeVon, Holli</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, Clark Hall, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Julie Johnson Zerwic</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Over 12 million Americans are currently living with coronary heart disease (CHD) and are at risk for an episode of unstable angina (UA) or myocardial infarction. Differences have been documented between women and men in the epidemiology, presentation, and outcomes of CHD. Despite these differences, it has been assumed that women and men experience the same symptoms during an episode of UA. The purpose of this study was to determine if there were gender differences in the symptoms of UA and if so, to determine if these differences remained after controlling for age, diabetes, anxiety, depression, and functional status. This descriptive study used a non-experimental, quantitative design. A convenience sample of 50 women and 50 men, hospitalized with unstable angina, were recruited from an urban and a suburban medical center. The Unstable Angina Symptoms Questionnaire (UASQ) was used to identify symptoms. Multivariate analysis indicated that women experienced significantly (p&lt; 0.05) more shortness of breath (74% vs. 60%), weakness (74% vs. 48%), difficulty breathing (66% vs. 38%), nausea (42% vs. 22%), and loss of appetite (40% vs. 10%) than men. After controlling for age, diabetes, anxiety, depression, and functional status, women were still more likely than men to report weakness (p=0.03), difficulty breathing (p=0.02), nausea (p=0.03), and loss of appetite (p=0.02). Chi-square analysis of symptom descriptors revealed that women disclosed more (p&lt;0.05) upper back pain (42% vs. 18%), stabbing pain (32% vs. 12%), and knifelike pain (28% vs. 12%). Findings suggest that women and men have similar symptoms during an episode of UA, however a higher proportion of women have less typical symptoms. Clinicians and patients should be aware of these differences to facilitate an accurate diagnosis and reduce time to treatment. AN: MN030357 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:54:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:54:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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