22.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160402
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding the Complexity of Registered Nurse Work in Acute Care Settings
Abstract:
Understanding the Complexity of Registered Nurse Work in Acute Care Settings
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Ebright, Patricia
P.I. Institution Name:IUPUI
Contact Address:SON, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Co-Authors:Emily S. Patterson; Barbara Chalko; Marta L. Render
The challenge for nursing administrators to focus on patient safety issues since the 1999 Institute of Medicine report has been complicated by predictions of significant nursing shortages over the next 20 years. Registered nurses (RNs) working in acute care settings encounter increasingly complex environments in which to provide care, and the demanding work environment is targeted by RNs as a major factor in retention. The purpose of this research was to discover the human and environmental factors that contribute to complexity in acute care settings and how expert RNs manage patient assignments in the midst of multiple demands. Using human performance models of complex system failure and cognitive work at the point of care as a theoretical framework, data were collected during direct observation and follow-up interviews of eight expert RNs about details surrounding actual working conditions in seven different acute care settings. A panel of nursing and human performance experts analyzed the data for patterns that characterized RN work in acute care settings including what factors affected information gathering, judgments, interventions, and outcomes. Analysis across RN data revealed nine patterns related to complexity of work, eight patterns related to cognitive drivers of work performance, and six patterns related to care management strategies. Findings from this study were consistent with characteristics of complex environments found in the literature related to unpredictability, ambiguity, and time pressures. Results of this study have implications for nursing administrators, educators, and practitioners related to future design of systems and educational strategies to decrease workplace demands and increase workload management competency. AN: MN030365
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding the Complexity of Registered Nurse Work in Acute Care Settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160402-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Understanding the Complexity of Registered Nurse Work in Acute Care Settings </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ebright, Patricia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">IUPUI</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Emily S. Patterson; Barbara Chalko; Marta L. Render </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The challenge for nursing administrators to focus on patient safety issues since the 1999 Institute of Medicine report has been complicated by predictions of significant nursing shortages over the next 20 years. Registered nurses (RNs) working in acute care settings encounter increasingly complex environments in which to provide care, and the demanding work environment is targeted by RNs as a major factor in retention. The purpose of this research was to discover the human and environmental factors that contribute to complexity in acute care settings and how expert RNs manage patient assignments in the midst of multiple demands. Using human performance models of complex system failure and cognitive work at the point of care as a theoretical framework, data were collected during direct observation and follow-up interviews of eight expert RNs about details surrounding actual working conditions in seven different acute care settings. A panel of nursing and human performance experts analyzed the data for patterns that characterized RN work in acute care settings including what factors affected information gathering, judgments, interventions, and outcomes. Analysis across RN data revealed nine patterns related to complexity of work, eight patterns related to cognitive drivers of work performance, and six patterns related to care management strategies. Findings from this study were consistent with characteristics of complex environments found in the literature related to unpredictability, ambiguity, and time pressures. Results of this study have implications for nursing administrators, educators, and practitioners related to future design of systems and educational strategies to decrease workplace demands and increase workload management competency. AN: MN030365 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:54:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:54:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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