Rebuilding Security: A family health promotion priority in the aftermath of woman abuse

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160406
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rebuilding Security: A family health promotion priority in the aftermath of woman abuse
Abstract:
Rebuilding Security: A family health promotion priority in the aftermath of woman abuse
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn
Contact Address:School of Nursing, London, ON, N6A 5C1, Canada
Co-Authors:Judith Wuest; Marilyn Merritt-Gray; Helene Berman
Single mothers report higher levels of past abuse than their married counterparts, yet the ways in which past woman abuse affects health promotion efforts of these families has not been studied. The purpose of this feminist grounded theory study was to develop a theory that explained health promotion processes of single-parent families (SPFs) who have left abusive partners/fathers. Data from repeat, semi-structured interviews conducted with a community sample of 40, diverse SPFs in two Canadian provinces were transcribed and analyzed using the constant comparative method (Glaser, 1978). The core problem experienced by these families after leaving is “intrusion” - unwanted interference in everyday life that stems from continued abuse and its fallout (i.e. health problems, changes in lifestyle and the “costs” of getting much needed help). In order to promote health and move beyond abuse, families engage in “Strengthening Capacity to Manage Intrusion” (the core process) in 4 priority areas. Rebuilding security, one such priority, is the process of redesigning a “normal” family life in which the risks, fear and isolation of past abuse are gradually replaced by a sense of relative safety and belonging. When intrusion is high, families engage in the process of “Safeguarding” in order to protect themselves from risks to physical or emotional safety by imposing their own isolation, at times, reaching out to others before it is safe to do so. When intrusion is lower and there is some stability in family life, the focus shifts from managing safety risks toward taking calculated risks in order to meet longer-term needs for belonging by developing supportive relationships (“Cautious Connecting”). Safeguarding and Cautious Connecting are linked processes that are enacted using different strategies, each of which is critical in Rebuilding Security. Implications for nursing practice as well as program and policy development will be discussed. AN: MN030292
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRebuilding Security: A family health promotion priority in the aftermath of woman abuseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160406-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Rebuilding Security: A family health promotion priority in the aftermath of woman abuse </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, London, ON, N6A 5C1, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith Wuest; Marilyn Merritt-Gray; Helene Berman </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Single mothers report higher levels of past abuse than their married counterparts, yet the ways in which past woman abuse affects health promotion efforts of these families has not been studied. The purpose of this feminist grounded theory study was to develop a theory that explained health promotion processes of single-parent families (SPFs) who have left abusive partners/fathers. Data from repeat, semi-structured interviews conducted with a community sample of 40, diverse SPFs in two Canadian provinces were transcribed and analyzed using the constant comparative method (Glaser, 1978). The core problem experienced by these families after leaving is &ldquo;intrusion&rdquo; - unwanted interference in everyday life that stems from continued abuse and its fallout (i.e. health problems, changes in lifestyle and the &ldquo;costs&rdquo; of getting much needed help). In order to promote health and move beyond abuse, families engage in &ldquo;Strengthening Capacity to Manage Intrusion&rdquo; (the core process) in 4 priority areas. Rebuilding security, one such priority, is the process of redesigning a &ldquo;normal&rdquo; family life in which the risks, fear and isolation of past abuse are gradually replaced by a sense of relative safety and belonging. When intrusion is high, families engage in the process of &ldquo;Safeguarding&rdquo; in order to protect themselves from risks to physical or emotional safety by imposing their own isolation, at times, reaching out to others before it is safe to do so. When intrusion is lower and there is some stability in family life, the focus shifts from managing safety risks toward taking calculated risks in order to meet longer-term needs for belonging by developing supportive relationships (&ldquo;Cautious Connecting&rdquo;). Safeguarding and Cautious Connecting are linked processes that are enacted using different strategies, each of which is critical in Rebuilding Security. Implications for nursing practice as well as program and policy development will be discussed. AN: MN030292</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:54:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:54:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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