9.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160408
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Literacy Assessment in Urban Medically Underserved Clinics
Abstract:
Health Literacy Assessment in Urban Medically Underserved Clinics
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Garvin, Bonnie
Contact Address:CON, 1585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Co-Authors:Doris Walzak
Low health literacy--the inability to read, understand, and appropriately use health care information--is an enormous barrier to optimal health care for many citizens. According to self-regulation theory, patients cope by processing information related to their health. Nationally, low health literacy is an expensive and pervasive problem in nearly 75% of persons who are older, of color, with disabilities, and in poverty. The purpose of this study was to assess the level of health literacy of persons served by inner-city clinics in a large Midwestern city. The Short Form of the Test of Functional Health Literacy for Adults (S-TOFHLA) (alpha=.95) was used in an interview to assess reading and comprehension. The adult, English speaking subjects (n =115) were primarily female (84.6%), Black (61.4%), had 9-12 years of education (68.3%), and were 46-59 years old (33.0%). Many patients could not read directions on a medication bottle (13.0%) or understand how to take medications as directed (23.5%). Many did not understand an appointment slip and when the next appointment would be (18.3%). Nearly a quarter of the patients (24.3%) was not able to determine normal blood sugar based on written normal ranges. Patients also did not perform well on the reading portion of the S-TOFHLA. Over 25% of the patients scored 75% or less on the reading items. Overall, S-TOFHLA scores show that 10.5% of the patients were classified as inadequate functional health literacy, 7.0% were marginal, and 82.5% had adequate functional health literacy scores. Demographic factors associated with low health literacy are discussed. This project will provide baseline data for a model program to increase awareness and capacity of health care providers regarding low health literacy. AN: MN030186
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Literacy Assessment in Urban Medically Underserved Clinicsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160408-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Literacy Assessment in Urban Medically Underserved Clinics</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Garvin, Bonnie</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 1585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Doris Walzak </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Low health literacy--the inability to read, understand, and appropriately use health care information--is an enormous barrier to optimal health care for many citizens. According to self-regulation theory, patients cope by processing information related to their health. Nationally, low health literacy is an expensive and pervasive problem in nearly 75% of persons who are older, of color, with disabilities, and in poverty. The purpose of this study was to assess the level of health literacy of persons served by inner-city clinics in a large Midwestern city. The Short Form of the Test of Functional Health Literacy for Adults (S-TOFHLA) (alpha=.95) was used in an interview to assess reading and comprehension. The adult, English speaking subjects (n =115) were primarily female (84.6%), Black (61.4%), had 9-12 years of education (68.3%), and were 46-59 years old (33.0%). Many patients could not read directions on a medication bottle (13.0%) or understand how to take medications as directed (23.5%). Many did not understand an appointment slip and when the next appointment would be (18.3%). Nearly a quarter of the patients (24.3%) was not able to determine normal blood sugar based on written normal ranges. Patients also did not perform well on the reading portion of the S-TOFHLA. Over 25% of the patients scored 75% or less on the reading items. Overall, S-TOFHLA scores show that 10.5% of the patients were classified as inadequate functional health literacy, 7.0% were marginal, and 82.5% had adequate functional health literacy scores. Demographic factors associated with low health literacy are discussed. This project will provide baseline data for a model program to increase awareness and capacity of health care providers regarding low health literacy. AN: MN030186 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:54:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:54:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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