2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160409
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural Differences in Choice of Therapeutic Music
Abstract:
Cultural Differences in Choice of Therapeutic Music
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Good, Marion
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland,, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Co-Authors:Bradford Picot; Safaa Salem; Chi-Chun Chin; Sandra Fulton Picot; Deforia Lane; Hui-Ling Lai; Sasitorn Phumdoung
Cultural differences in music preferences were compared across seven studies in which subjects chose among the same five types of music for either pain or sleep (Good, 1995), but two added one culturally appropriate type of music. This is a descriptive review using Leininger’s model with settings in the US, Taiwan, and Thailand. The research questions were: (1) What cultural differences were there in choice among five types of therapeutic music? (2) When culturally specific music was offered in addition to the five types, did the choices change? Participants included Caucasian, African Americans, Taiwanese and Thai adults who were experiencing postoperative, labor, or experimental pain, or insomnia. In five studies, the intervention was a choice among five types of sedative music, while in two, choices also included one type of music potentially associated with cultural preferences, gospel or Chinese orchestra music. Subjects listened to short excerpts of each type of music and told the investigator which one they chose to use for pain or sleep. Preferences were described as (a) the percentage of subjects choosing each music type, and (b) the most frequently chosen type by cultural group. Although Caucasians most frequently chose orchestra music, African Americans chose jazz, Taiwanese chose harp music, and Thai chose piano, the majority chose among the other types of music. When culturally appropriate music was also offered, choices were different; 20%-23% chose it. Thus cultural differences in choice of music changed when culturally specific music was added. Nurses, who use music therapeutically, need to provide choices that include music that is congruent with a person’s beliefs and lifeways (Leininger, 1995). More research is needed, starting with simple surveys of cultural music preferences. AN: MN030117
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural Differences in Choice of Therapeutic Musicen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160409-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cultural Differences in Choice of Therapeutic Music </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Good, Marion</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland,, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bradford Picot; Safaa Salem; Chi-Chun Chin; Sandra Fulton Picot; Deforia Lane; Hui-Ling Lai; Sasitorn Phumdoung </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cultural differences in music preferences were compared across seven studies in which subjects chose among the same five types of music for either pain or sleep (Good, 1995), but two added one culturally appropriate type of music. This is a descriptive review using Leininger&rsquo;s model with settings in the US, Taiwan, and Thailand. The research questions were: (1) What cultural differences were there in choice among five types of therapeutic music? (2) When culturally specific music was offered in addition to the five types, did the choices change? Participants included Caucasian, African Americans, Taiwanese and Thai adults who were experiencing postoperative, labor, or experimental pain, or insomnia. In five studies, the intervention was a choice among five types of sedative music, while in two, choices also included one type of music potentially associated with cultural preferences, gospel or Chinese orchestra music. Subjects listened to short excerpts of each type of music and told the investigator which one they chose to use for pain or sleep. Preferences were described as (a) the percentage of subjects choosing each music type, and (b) the most frequently chosen type by cultural group. Although Caucasians most frequently chose orchestra music, African Americans chose jazz, Taiwanese chose harp music, and Thai chose piano, the majority chose among the other types of music. When culturally appropriate music was also offered, choices were different; 20%-23% chose it. Thus cultural differences in choice of music changed when culturally specific music was added. Nurses, who use music therapeutically, need to provide choices that include music that is congruent with a person&rsquo;s beliefs and lifeways (Leininger, 1995). More research is needed, starting with simple surveys of cultural music preferences. AN: MN030117 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:54:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:54:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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