2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160411
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationships Among Pain, Imagery, and Child Characteristics
Abstract:
Relationships Among Pain, Imagery, and Child Characteristics
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Huth, Myra
Contact Address:Pain & Palliative Care Center, 9000 W. Wisconsin Avenue, PO Box 1997, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1997, USA
This experimental study investigated the effectiveness of distraction using imagery, plus routine analgesics, in reducing tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy pain in 7-12-year old children during ambulatory surgery and at home based on the Neuman Systems (1995) and McCaul/Malott (1984) Models. Children were recruited from five Ambulatory Surgery Centers (ASC) and Short Stay Surgery Units (SSU). Seventy-three children were randomly assigned to two groups. Thirty-six children in the experimental group watched a professionally developed videotape on the use of imagery and then listened to a 30-minute audiotape of imagery approximately one week prior to surgery (T1). They listened to only the audiotape one to four hours after surgery (T2) and 22-27 hours after discharge from the ASC or SSU (T3). The 37 children in the comparison group received standard care. Measures of sensory (Oucher and amount of analgesics) and affective pain (Facial Affective Scale and State Anxiety Inventory for Children) were obtained at each of the time points in both groups. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to examine all relationships. Correlations showed that trait anxiety was significantly related to all affective pain measures at T2 and T3. Gender was not significantly related to sensory or affective pain measures at any time, but age was significantly correlated to sensory and affective pain measures at T3. Imagery practice was not significantly related to any pain measures. Trait anxiety was not significantly related to imagery at any time point. However, older age was related to higher imagery scores at T2 only. In this sample, correlations among pain measures, imagery, and child characteristics were not consistently significant at T2 and T3. This may be due to children’s understanding, past experience with pain, their attitudes and expectations, the type of pain experienced, and instruments used. Children’s perceptions of pain change over time and in different environments. AN: MN030301
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationships Among Pain, Imagery, and Child Characteristicsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160411-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationships Among Pain, Imagery, and Child Characteristics </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Huth, Myra</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Pain &amp; Palliative Care Center, 9000 W. Wisconsin Avenue, PO Box 1997, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1997, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This experimental study investigated the effectiveness of distraction using imagery, plus routine analgesics, in reducing tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy pain in 7-12-year old children during ambulatory surgery and at home based on the Neuman Systems (1995) and McCaul/Malott (1984) Models. Children were recruited from five Ambulatory Surgery Centers (ASC) and Short Stay Surgery Units (SSU). Seventy-three children were randomly assigned to two groups. Thirty-six children in the experimental group watched a professionally developed videotape on the use of imagery and then listened to a 30-minute audiotape of imagery approximately one week prior to surgery (T1). They listened to only the audiotape one to four hours after surgery (T2) and 22-27 hours after discharge from the ASC or SSU (T3). The 37 children in the comparison group received standard care. Measures of sensory (Oucher and amount of analgesics) and affective pain (Facial Affective Scale and State Anxiety Inventory for Children) were obtained at each of the time points in both groups. Pearson&rsquo;s correlation coefficient was used to examine all relationships. Correlations showed that trait anxiety was significantly related to all affective pain measures at T2 and T3. Gender was not significantly related to sensory or affective pain measures at any time, but age was significantly correlated to sensory and affective pain measures at T3. Imagery practice was not significantly related to any pain measures. Trait anxiety was not significantly related to imagery at any time point. However, older age was related to higher imagery scores at T2 only. In this sample, correlations among pain measures, imagery, and child characteristics were not consistently significant at T2 and T3. This may be due to children&rsquo;s understanding, past experience with pain, their attitudes and expectations, the type of pain experienced, and instruments used. Children&rsquo;s perceptions of pain change over time and in different environments. AN: MN030301</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:55:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:55:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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