2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160413
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sensorimotor function in offspring of male rats exposed to alcohol
Abstract:
Sensorimotor function in offspring of male rats exposed to alcohol
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Jamerson, Patricia
P.I. Institution Name:St. Louis Children's Hospital
Contact Address:163 Spring Brook Ct, St. Charles, MO, 63303, USA
While more males use alcohol than females, little is known about the effects of paternal alcohol use on the offspring. It is important to nurses who work with childbearing families to know if paternally mediated effects may occur in order to prevent adverse outcomes. Previous research has suggested alterations in growth and development, including changes in brain neuroarchitecture; but studies exploring the effects of sensorimotor function are rare. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of alcohol exposure on the sensorimotor function of the pups of Sprague Dawley (SD) rat sires. An experimental design was used in which sixteen SD sires were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=8) that received the Lieber DiCarli liquid alcohol diet, or a control group (n=8) that received the liquid control diet. The sires were bred to alcohol-naïve dams and the pups tested for their response to sensorimotor components of the Functional Observational Battery (approach, touch, click, and tail pinch responses) and level of activity on a continuous corridor maze. Pups from sires exposed to alcohol were noted to significantly respond more passively to tail pinch stimuli than control pups and to be less active in the continuous corridor maze. These findings suggest the presence of paternally mediated alcohol effects on offspring. AN: MN030326
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSensorimotor function in offspring of male rats exposed to alcoholen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160413-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sensorimotor function in offspring of male rats exposed to alcohol</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jamerson, Patricia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Louis Children's Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">163 Spring Brook Ct, St. Charles, MO, 63303, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">While more males use alcohol than females, little is known about the effects of paternal alcohol use on the offspring. It is important to nurses who work with childbearing families to know if paternally mediated effects may occur in order to prevent adverse outcomes. Previous research has suggested alterations in growth and development, including changes in brain neuroarchitecture; but studies exploring the effects of sensorimotor function are rare. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of alcohol exposure on the sensorimotor function of the pups of Sprague Dawley (SD) rat sires. An experimental design was used in which sixteen SD sires were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=8) that received the Lieber DiCarli liquid alcohol diet, or a control group (n=8) that received the liquid control diet. The sires were bred to alcohol-na&iuml;ve dams and the pups tested for their response to sensorimotor components of the Functional Observational Battery (approach, touch, click, and tail pinch responses) and level of activity on a continuous corridor maze. Pups from sires exposed to alcohol were noted to significantly respond more passively to tail pinch stimuli than control pups and to be less active in the continuous corridor maze. These findings suggest the presence of paternally mediated alcohol effects on offspring. AN: MN030326 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:55:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:55:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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