Mentally Restorative Activities and Their Relationship to Health among Community-Dwelling Elders

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160414
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mentally Restorative Activities and Their Relationship to Health among Community-Dwelling Elders
Abstract:
Mentally Restorative Activities and Their Relationship to Health among Community-Dwelling Elders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Jansen, Debra
Contact Address: Adult Health Nursing, 105 Garfield Ave, PO Box 4004, Eau Claire, WI, 54702-4004, USA
Promoting health and functioning are essential to well-being as people grow older. Based on the Kaplan Attention Restoration Theory, exposure to mentally restorative activities, such as observing nature, is associated with improved concentration and feelings of greater mental energy and refreshment. It follows that improvements could occur in mental and physical health as well. However, little research and few instruments exist pertaining to the benefits and types of restorative activities engaged in by elders, a group in need of means to promote optimal health and functioning. The purposes of this study were to determine the psychometrics of the newly created Restorative Activity Assessment (RAA) instrument, and the relationship of restorative activities to perceived health. The RAA consisted of 15 items of potentially restorative activities. Each item was rated using Likert-type scales according to a) frequency of participation and b) feelings of being “restored” (more mental energy, refreshed, rested, at peace) after engaging in the activity; two corresponding subscales were created. The RAA was administered to 33 community-dwelling elderly (25 females, 8 males; ages 65-90 years, M=76 years). Twenty-four participants completed the RAA 2 weeks later as a measure of test-retest reliability: r=.90 and .93 for the frequency of participation and restored subscales, respectively. Internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha) was .62 (Time 1) and .74 (Time 2) for the frequency of participation subscale; and .85 (Time 1) and .88 (Time 2) for the restored subscale. A self-rating of health correlated significantly with frequency of participation (r=.45, p=.01) and restored feelings (r=.54, p < .01). In the future, the RAA will be further refined and used to systematically assess the benefits afforded by restorative activities and their relationships to specific aspects of mental and physical health and well-being for elders. AN: MN030223
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMentally Restorative Activities and Their Relationship to Health among Community-Dwelling Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160414-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mentally Restorative Activities and Their Relationship to Health among Community-Dwelling Elders </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jansen, Debra</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value"> Adult Health Nursing, 105 Garfield Ave, PO Box 4004, Eau Claire, WI, 54702-4004, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Promoting health and functioning are essential to well-being as people grow older. Based on the Kaplan Attention Restoration Theory, exposure to mentally restorative activities, such as observing nature, is associated with improved concentration and feelings of greater mental energy and refreshment. It follows that improvements could occur in mental and physical health as well. However, little research and few instruments exist pertaining to the benefits and types of restorative activities engaged in by elders, a group in need of means to promote optimal health and functioning. The purposes of this study were to determine the psychometrics of the newly created Restorative Activity Assessment (RAA) instrument, and the relationship of restorative activities to perceived health. The RAA consisted of 15 items of potentially restorative activities. Each item was rated using Likert-type scales according to a) frequency of participation and b) feelings of being &ldquo;restored&rdquo; (more mental energy, refreshed, rested, at peace) after engaging in the activity; two corresponding subscales were created. The RAA was administered to 33 community-dwelling elderly (25 females, 8 males; ages 65-90 years, M=76 years). Twenty-four participants completed the RAA 2 weeks later as a measure of test-retest reliability: r=.90 and .93 for the frequency of participation and restored subscales, respectively. Internal consistency (Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha) was .62 (Time 1) and .74 (Time 2) for the frequency of participation subscale; and .85 (Time 1) and .88 (Time 2) for the restored subscale. A self-rating of health correlated significantly with frequency of participation (r=.45, p=.01) and restored feelings (r=.54, p &lt; .01). In the future, the RAA will be further refined and used to systematically assess the benefits afforded by restorative activities and their relationships to specific aspects of mental and physical health and well-being for elders. AN: MN030223 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:55:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:55:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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