2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160417
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Living Alone in Japan: Perceived Quality of Life of Japanese Elderly
Abstract:
Living Alone in Japan: Perceived Quality of Life of Japanese Elderly
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Katsuno, Towako
Contact Address:Nursing Sciences, 7-2-10 Higashiogu, Arakawa-ku, Tokyo, Japan
In Japan the growing number of elderly who live alone in the community has significant current implications for health-service needs. Although traditional Confucian teaching of filial piety still exists in Japan, the values and practices of it have changed. Changes in family structure may affect the family's supportive function to the elderly. It is not known how the change in living arrangements impacts the person's psychosocial well-being. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceived quality of life of this population and potential factors related to their quality of life. A mail survey was conducted in a metropolitan area of Japan in 2001. The mean age of the 45 respondents was 73.6 years (SD=6.0). Being widowed was the most prominent reason for living alone (77%), although 12 of them had one or more children. The mean scores for the Single Item Quality of Life Scale (SIQLS; range: 0-10) and the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Moral Scale (PGCMS; Lawton, 1972; range: 1-17) were 4.71(SD=2.6) and 7.40(SD=4.9), respectively. There was a significant correlation between the SIQLS and the PGCMS. Having a hobby and an overall feeling of happiness were significantly related to the SIQLS. However, 19 respondents (42%) now experienced no happy time in their life at all. The results suggest that the perceived quality of life in this population is quite low and imply the need for specific nursing strategies in order to enhance their quality of life. AN: MN030212
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLiving Alone in Japan: Perceived Quality of Life of Japanese Elderlyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160417-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Living Alone in Japan: Perceived Quality of Life of Japanese Elderly</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Katsuno, Towako </td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Sciences, 7-2-10 Higashiogu, Arakawa-ku, Tokyo, Japan</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In Japan the growing number of elderly who live alone in the community has significant current implications for health-service needs. Although traditional Confucian teaching of filial piety still exists in Japan, the values and practices of it have changed. Changes in family structure may affect the family's supportive function to the elderly. It is not known how the change in living arrangements impacts the person's psychosocial well-being. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceived quality of life of this population and potential factors related to their quality of life. A mail survey was conducted in a metropolitan area of Japan in 2001. The mean age of the 45 respondents was 73.6 years (SD=6.0). Being widowed was the most prominent reason for living alone (77%), although 12 of them had one or more children. The mean scores for the Single Item Quality of Life Scale (SIQLS; range: 0-10) and the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Moral Scale (PGCMS; Lawton, 1972; range: 1-17) were 4.71(SD=2.6) and 7.40(SD=4.9), respectively. There was a significant correlation between the SIQLS and the PGCMS. Having a hobby and an overall feeling of happiness were significantly related to the SIQLS. However, 19 respondents (42%) now experienced no happy time in their life at all. The results suggest that the perceived quality of life in this population is quite low and imply the need for specific nursing strategies in order to enhance their quality of life. AN: MN030212 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:55:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:55:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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