Symptom Assessment for Preverbal and Early Verbal Children: Assessment for Pain and Nausea in Children 1 through 5 Years of Age

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160419
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom Assessment for Preverbal and Early Verbal Children: Assessment for Pain and Nausea in Children 1 through 5 Years of Age
Abstract:
Symptom Assessment for Preverbal and Early Verbal Children: Assessment for Pain and Nausea in Children 1 through 5 Years of Age
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Keller, Vicki
Contact Address:SON, 1219 Greenfield Dr, Greenfield, IN, 46140, USA
: PURPOSE It was the purpose of this study to test a new instrument for observational assessment of nausea in children 1 through 5 years of age. The instrument for nausea assessment and a previously established pain scale were used to determine whether scores discriminate between those children whose medical diagnosis and presenting complaint are consistent with the presence of nausea, pain, neither, or both. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK Symptoms are identified as subjective experiences that reflect alterations in a person's biological, psychological, social, functional, or cognitive status. Although symptoms are subjective and can only be completely known and described by the person experiencing them, observable indicators can be used to assess for the presence of symptoms in persons who are unable to give a verbal self-report. Observable indicators of symptoms include distress, alterations in affect and behaviors, and physiological alterations. SAMPLE A convenience sample of 100 subjects 1 through 5 years old were recruited from children coming for visits to a pediatric outpatient clinic. METHOD Children were assessed for pain and nausea using the University of Wisconsin Children's Hospital Pain Scale and the Keller Index of Nausea. The parents completed a brief information sheet about the reason for the clinic visit, the child's symptoms, and demographic information. After the child has been assessed and pain and nausea scores assigned, the medical diagnosis for the child for that day's visit was obtained from the child's chart. RESULTS Data analysis is still in progress. Preliminary results using point-biserial analyses show statistically significant positive correlations between the nausea scores and each of the following: nausea expected based on the medical diagnosis, nausea expected based on the presenting complaint, and nausea reported by the parent. AN: MN030338
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom Assessment for Preverbal and Early Verbal Children: Assessment for Pain and Nausea in Children 1 through 5 Years of Ageen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160419-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symptom Assessment for Preverbal and Early Verbal Children: Assessment for Pain and Nausea in Children 1 through 5 Years of Age </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Keller, Vicki</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1219 Greenfield Dr, Greenfield, IN, 46140, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">: PURPOSE It was the purpose of this study to test a new instrument for observational assessment of nausea in children 1 through 5 years of age. The instrument for nausea assessment and a previously established pain scale were used to determine whether scores discriminate between those children whose medical diagnosis and presenting complaint are consistent with the presence of nausea, pain, neither, or both. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK Symptoms are identified as subjective experiences that reflect alterations in a person's biological, psychological, social, functional, or cognitive status. Although symptoms are subjective and can only be completely known and described by the person experiencing them, observable indicators can be used to assess for the presence of symptoms in persons who are unable to give a verbal self-report. Observable indicators of symptoms include distress, alterations in affect and behaviors, and physiological alterations. SAMPLE A convenience sample of 100 subjects 1 through 5 years old were recruited from children coming for visits to a pediatric outpatient clinic. METHOD Children were assessed for pain and nausea using the University of Wisconsin Children's Hospital Pain Scale and the Keller Index of Nausea. The parents completed a brief information sheet about the reason for the clinic visit, the child's symptoms, and demographic information. After the child has been assessed and pain and nausea scores assigned, the medical diagnosis for the child for that day's visit was obtained from the child's chart. RESULTS Data analysis is still in progress. Preliminary results using point-biserial analyses show statistically significant positive correlations between the nausea scores and each of the following: nausea expected based on the medical diagnosis, nausea expected based on the presenting complaint, and nausea reported by the parent. AN: MN030338 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:55:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:55:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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