2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160420
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attitudes Toward and Incidence of Gambling Among College Athletes
Abstract:
Attitudes Toward and Incidence of Gambling Among College Athletes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Kerber, Cindy
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Contact Address:Mennonite College of Nursing, Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61761, USA
The purpose of this research was to study attitudes toward and incidence of problem and pathological gambling in college athletes at three Midwest universities. According to the Chronicle of Higher Education (Gose, 2000), college students are three times more likely than adults in the general population to become problem gamblers. Results of recent studies (Bourne, 1998; Rocky, 1998) suggest that college student athletes are at least twice as likely as their non-athlete peers to become problem gamblers. College athletes completed two questionnaires: the South Oaks Gambling Screen developed by Lesieur and Blume (1987, 1993) and the Gambling Attitudes Scales developed by Kassinove (1998). Regression analysis was employed to identify demographic, attitudinal, and other correlates of potential problem or pathological gambling. A profile of the at risk college athlete was developed to help administrators and university counselors determine the need for services or instructional programs that could be provided to reduce or prevent deleterious gambling behavior. This information base then was shared through focus groups with the athletic program directors at three Midwestern universities. The profile of the at-risk college athlete, according to the results of this study, is a male athlete who gambles frequently, has family and/or friends with perceived gambling problems, is non-white, is older, started gambling younger, prefers games of skill, and holds positive attitudes toward gambling in general or Internet gambling. Focused group discussions recommended education to prevent deleterious gambling behavior and counseling for students experiencing gambling-related problems. In conclusion, most college athletes (75.9) have gambled at some point in their life; the most frequently engaged in form of gambling is playing games of skill or playing cards for money; one in five college athletes indicated they had gambled on sports at some point in their life and only a minority (15%) may be problem or pathological gamblers based on SOGS scores. AN: MN030089
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttitudes Toward and Incidence of Gambling Among College Athletesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160420-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Attitudes Toward and Incidence of Gambling Among College Athletes </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kerber, Cindy</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Mennonite College of Nursing, Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61761, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this research was to study attitudes toward and incidence of problem and pathological gambling in college athletes at three Midwest universities. According to the Chronicle of Higher Education (Gose, 2000), college students are three times more likely than adults in the general population to become problem gamblers. Results of recent studies (Bourne, 1998; Rocky, 1998) suggest that college student athletes are at least twice as likely as their non-athlete peers to become problem gamblers. College athletes completed two questionnaires: the South Oaks Gambling Screen developed by Lesieur and Blume (1987, 1993) and the Gambling Attitudes Scales developed by Kassinove (1998). Regression analysis was employed to identify demographic, attitudinal, and other correlates of potential problem or pathological gambling. A profile of the at risk college athlete was developed to help administrators and university counselors determine the need for services or instructional programs that could be provided to reduce or prevent deleterious gambling behavior. This information base then was shared through focus groups with the athletic program directors at three Midwestern universities. The profile of the at-risk college athlete, according to the results of this study, is a male athlete who gambles frequently, has family and/or friends with perceived gambling problems, is non-white, is older, started gambling younger, prefers games of skill, and holds positive attitudes toward gambling in general or Internet gambling. Focused group discussions recommended education to prevent deleterious gambling behavior and counseling for students experiencing gambling-related problems. In conclusion, most college athletes (75.9) have gambled at some point in their life; the most frequently engaged in form of gambling is playing games of skill or playing cards for money; one in five college athletes indicated they had gambled on sports at some point in their life and only a minority (15%) may be problem or pathological gamblers based on SOGS scores. AN: MN030089 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:55:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:55:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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