2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160425
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adherence to Antiretroviral medication in women with HIV/AIDS
Abstract:
Adherence to Antiretroviral medication in women with HIV/AIDS
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Langner, Suzanne
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 848 North 26th Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19130, USA
A pilot study of 52 minority women receiving health care in an eastern urban community was conducted over a period of 10 months. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to investigate 1) the extent of HIV positive women's adherence to anti-retroviral therapy, 2) the relationship of adherence to women's quality of life, depression, CD4 count and viral burden. Van Manen's approach to phenomenology was used to explore the experience of being a woman who is HIV positive and who must take a daily regimen of multiple anti-retroviral medications. Data were collected through serial in-depth face-to-face interviews at two 6-month intervals with subjects' completion of instruments to measure quality of life, depression and self-report of adherence. Extensive medical chart review and examination of computerized pharmacy records for objective evaluation of adherence over a 10 month period were also performed. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and subjected to sentence by sentence qualitative analysis using the approach laid out by VanManen. Subjects who obtained less than 90% of prescribed refills over 10 months were considered non-adherent. Twenty-four percent of the women had 90% or better adherence. There was no relationship between objective adherence, quality of life, self-report or depression. Although 76% of women were nonadherent, there was no significance between CD4 count and viral load at the conclusion of the 10 month period. The qualitative analysis revealed the following: women's perceptions of barriers to adherence, their experiences of HIV affected their daily lives, about how stigma and their experiences with health care providers affected their medication adherence, the role of family and the workplace in promoting or inhibiting adherence, and how their lives had changed since their diagnosis of HIV positivity and being placed on medications. AN: MN030073
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdherence to Antiretroviral medication in women with HIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160425-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adherence to Antiretroviral medication in women with HIV/AIDS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Langner, Suzanne</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 848 North 26th Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19130, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A pilot study of 52 minority women receiving health care in an eastern urban community was conducted over a period of 10 months. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to investigate 1) the extent of HIV positive women's adherence to anti-retroviral therapy, 2) the relationship of adherence to women's quality of life, depression, CD4 count and viral burden. Van Manen's approach to phenomenology was used to explore the experience of being a woman who is HIV positive and who must take a daily regimen of multiple anti-retroviral medications. Data were collected through serial in-depth face-to-face interviews at two 6-month intervals with subjects' completion of instruments to measure quality of life, depression and self-report of adherence. Extensive medical chart review and examination of computerized pharmacy records for objective evaluation of adherence over a 10 month period were also performed. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and subjected to sentence by sentence qualitative analysis using the approach laid out by VanManen. Subjects who obtained less than 90% of prescribed refills over 10 months were considered non-adherent. Twenty-four percent of the women had 90% or better adherence. There was no relationship between objective adherence, quality of life, self-report or depression. Although 76% of women were nonadherent, there was no significance between CD4 count and viral load at the conclusion of the 10 month period. The qualitative analysis revealed the following: women's perceptions of barriers to adherence, their experiences of HIV affected their daily lives, about how stigma and their experiences with health care providers affected their medication adherence, the role of family and the workplace in promoting or inhibiting adherence, and how their lives had changed since their diagnosis of HIV positivity and being placed on medications. AN: MN030073 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:55:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:55:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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