The Relationships Between Demographic Characteristics and Organizational Commitment of Nurse Administrators

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160427
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationships Between Demographic Characteristics and Organizational Commitment of Nurse Administrators
Abstract:
The Relationships Between Demographic Characteristics and Organizational Commitment of Nurse Administrators
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Leis, Sheila
Contact Address:College of Nursing and Health, 7227 Miami County Line Road, Union, OH, 45322, USA
This descriptive study examined the level of, and factors impacting organizational commitment of nurse administrators. The Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ), (Porter, 1982) was used to measure level of organizational commitment. A second tool examined demographic characteristics, intent to remain employed at the hospital for < or > 12 months, and requested participants to identify other factors that might impact their organizational commitment. A modified version of Steers’ model of organizational commitment (1977) was used as the theoretical framework. Steers’ model identifies antecedents of organizational commitment to include characteristics of the person, the job, and the organization. Steers’ model identifies outcomes of organizational commitment to include reduced turnover, reduced absenteeism, and job satisfaction. All nurse managers and shift managers at an 800+ bed Midwestern hospital were invited to participate and surveys were returned by 82 nurse administrators (return rate 52%). The SPSS, version 10.0 was used to derive the statistics. No significant relationship was found between OCQ score and intent to remain. The mean OCQ score for respondents was 4.47 (scale of 1=low to 7=high). Seventy-four respondents (90.2%) indicated intent to remain at the organization > one year (mean OCQ=4.79) and seven respondents (8.5%) indicated intent to remain < one year (mean OCQ=4.47). For nurse managers, being married related to lower OCQ score. Longer length of employment and practice in medical-surgical areas related to higher OCQ score. For shift managers, longer number of years licensed related to lower OCQ score. Longer length of employment and 12-hour shifts related to higher OCQ score. Most common additional factors identified as affecting organizational commitment were (1) competitive wages, (2) increased workload and (3) desire to be included in decision-making. Implications include a need to provide compensation and work expectations that are perceived to be fair and flexibility in schedules. AN: MN030048
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationships Between Demographic Characteristics and Organizational Commitment of Nurse Administratorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160427-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationships Between Demographic Characteristics and Organizational Commitment of Nurse Administrators </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Leis, Sheila</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing and Health, 7227 Miami County Line Road, Union, OH, 45322, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This descriptive study examined the level of, and factors impacting organizational commitment of nurse administrators. The Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ), (Porter, 1982) was used to measure level of organizational commitment. A second tool examined demographic characteristics, intent to remain employed at the hospital for &lt; or &gt; 12 months, and requested participants to identify other factors that might impact their organizational commitment. A modified version of Steers&rsquo; model of organizational commitment (1977) was used as the theoretical framework. Steers&rsquo; model identifies antecedents of organizational commitment to include characteristics of the person, the job, and the organization. Steers&rsquo; model identifies outcomes of organizational commitment to include reduced turnover, reduced absenteeism, and job satisfaction. All nurse managers and shift managers at an 800+ bed Midwestern hospital were invited to participate and surveys were returned by 82 nurse administrators (return rate 52%). The SPSS, version 10.0 was used to derive the statistics. No significant relationship was found between OCQ score and intent to remain. The mean OCQ score for respondents was 4.47 (scale of 1=low to 7=high). Seventy-four respondents (90.2%) indicated intent to remain at the organization &gt; one year (mean OCQ=4.79) and seven respondents (8.5%) indicated intent to remain &lt; one year (mean OCQ=4.47). For nurse managers, being married related to lower OCQ score. Longer length of employment and practice in medical-surgical areas related to higher OCQ score. For shift managers, longer number of years licensed related to lower OCQ score. Longer length of employment and 12-hour shifts related to higher OCQ score. Most common additional factors identified as affecting organizational commitment were (1) competitive wages, (2) increased workload and (3) desire to be included in decision-making. Implications include a need to provide compensation and work expectations that are perceived to be fair and flexibility in schedules. AN: MN030048 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:55:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:55:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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