Relationship among Lifestyle Behaviors, Sleep Profile and Sleep Consequences in Night Shift Workers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160428
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship among Lifestyle Behaviors, Sleep Profile and Sleep Consequences in Night Shift Workers
Abstract:
Relationship among Lifestyle Behaviors, Sleep Profile and Sleep Consequences in Night Shift Workers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Liette, Cynthia
Contact Address:3744 Menchhofer Rd, Coldwater, MI, 45828, USA
The purpose of this research study was to examine specific lifestyle behaviors of night shift workers known to enhance sleep or lead to sleep deprivation, the worker’s self-reported sleep profile, and the relationship of the sleep profile to physiologic and psychosocial health, and safety consequences. The conceptual schematic for the study focused on three major variables including lifestyle behaviors, sleep profile, and sleep consequences such as health and safety and psychosocial factors. The research design was descriptive correlational. The sample included 146 employees working between the hours of 1900 and 0800 in health care or manufacturing facilities in the Midwest. Some of the workers worked eight hour shifts, while others worked 12 hour shifts. Data was analyzed using ANCOVA, Kappa, McNemar’s test, Fisher’s test and chi-square. Analysis of the data revealed significant relationships between: (1) sleep enhancing behaviors (p-value=0.0016) and sleep depriving behaviors (p value=<0.0001) and the sleep profile; (2) the time working nights and diabetes (p value=0.0278); (3) between sleep deprived workers and the incidence of “near misses” while driving home after a night shift (p value=0.0472), and weight change (p value=0.0330); (4) positive relationships between effective sleep and an expressed preference for night shift (p value=0.0169) and a feeling that more sleep was obtained while on night shift (p value=0.0187); (5) significant relationships between sleep deprived workers and stress levels at home (p value=0.0321) and spouse/partner support of the need for sleep (p value=0.0362) were also found. The findings in this study, could have an impact on the design and implementation of a health promotion program for night shift workers. AN: MN030039
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship among Lifestyle Behaviors, Sleep Profile and Sleep Consequences in Night Shift Workersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160428-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship among Lifestyle Behaviors, Sleep Profile and Sleep Consequences in Night Shift Workers </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Liette, Cynthia</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3744 Menchhofer Rd, Coldwater, MI, 45828, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this research study was to examine specific lifestyle behaviors of night shift workers known to enhance sleep or lead to sleep deprivation, the worker&rsquo;s self-reported sleep profile, and the relationship of the sleep profile to physiologic and psychosocial health, and safety consequences. The conceptual schematic for the study focused on three major variables including lifestyle behaviors, sleep profile, and sleep consequences such as health and safety and psychosocial factors. The research design was descriptive correlational. The sample included 146 employees working between the hours of 1900 and 0800 in health care or manufacturing facilities in the Midwest. Some of the workers worked eight hour shifts, while others worked 12 hour shifts. Data was analyzed using ANCOVA, Kappa, McNemar&rsquo;s test, Fisher&rsquo;s test and chi-square. Analysis of the data revealed significant relationships between: (1) sleep enhancing behaviors (p-value=0.0016) and sleep depriving behaviors (p value=&lt;0.0001) and the sleep profile; (2) the time working nights and diabetes (p value=0.0278); (3) between sleep deprived workers and the incidence of &ldquo;near misses&rdquo; while driving home after a night shift (p value=0.0472), and weight change (p value=0.0330); (4) positive relationships between effective sleep and an expressed preference for night shift (p value=0.0169) and a feeling that more sleep was obtained while on night shift (p value=0.0187); (5) significant relationships between sleep deprived workers and stress levels at home (p value=0.0321) and spouse/partner support of the need for sleep (p value=0.0362) were also found. The findings in this study, could have an impact on the design and implementation of a health promotion program for night shift workers. AN: MN030039</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:56:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:56:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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