Readiness to Change and Brief Educational Interventions for Adults at Risk for Stroke

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160429
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Readiness to Change and Brief Educational Interventions for Adults at Risk for Stroke
Abstract:
Readiness to Change and Brief Educational Interventions for Adults at Risk for Stroke
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Miller, Elaine
Contact Address:CON, 4 Hickory Hollow, Cincinnati, OH, 45241, USA
Co-Authors:Judith Spilker
This pilot study used a repeated measures design that examined: (1) the influence of different educational interventions upon knowledge and behavior changes related to reducing stroke risk; and (2) how age, readiness to change, perceived health status, functional status, depression, and quality of life affected knowledge and the initiation of behaviors to reduce stroke risk. Three groups of 20 adult subjects with multiple stroke risk factors were randomly assigned to a control, simple advice, or brief intervention group. The majority of the subjects were African American with an age range of 55-93 and mean age of 68. The theoretical underpinnings for the study’s educational interventions were shaped by motivational interviewing and the readiness to change. All subjects received the same initial assessment and exit interview at 3 months, but the simple advice and brief intervention groups received additional contact time and advice. Selected pilot study findings were: (1) there were significant differences between groups related to the total number of new stroke risk reduction behaviors achieved (F=5.4, df=2, p. 001); (2) there were significant correlations between the action stage of change and stroke knowledge and risk reduction behaviors; (3) significant differences occurred between groups from pre to posttest pertaining to knowledge of stroke symptoms ( F=22.1, df=2, p=001) and major risk factors (F=7.39, df=2, p=.01); and (4) across groups there was a significant difference related to depression (F=10.8, df=2, p. 002). Findings support the usefulness of this intervention model to reduce modifiable stroke risk factors, increase knowledge related to stroke signs/symptoms and stroke risk factors and decrease depression for diverse racial backgrounds. AN: MN030290
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReadiness to Change and Brief Educational Interventions for Adults at Risk for Strokeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160429-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Readiness to Change and Brief Educational Interventions for Adults at Risk for Stroke </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Miller, Elaine</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 4 Hickory Hollow, Cincinnati, OH, 45241, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith Spilker</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This pilot study used a repeated measures design that examined: (1) the influence of different educational interventions upon knowledge and behavior changes related to reducing stroke risk; and (2) how age, readiness to change, perceived health status, functional status, depression, and quality of life affected knowledge and the initiation of behaviors to reduce stroke risk. Three groups of 20 adult subjects with multiple stroke risk factors were randomly assigned to a control, simple advice, or brief intervention group. The majority of the subjects were African American with an age range of 55-93 and mean age of 68. The theoretical underpinnings for the study&rsquo;s educational interventions were shaped by motivational interviewing and the readiness to change. All subjects received the same initial assessment and exit interview at 3 months, but the simple advice and brief intervention groups received additional contact time and advice. Selected pilot study findings were: (1) there were significant differences between groups related to the total number of new stroke risk reduction behaviors achieved (F=5.4, df=2, p. 001); (2) there were significant correlations between the action stage of change and stroke knowledge and risk reduction behaviors; (3) significant differences occurred between groups from pre to posttest pertaining to knowledge of stroke symptoms ( F=22.1, df=2, p=001) and major risk factors (F=7.39, df=2, p=.01); and (4) across groups there was a significant difference related to depression (F=10.8, df=2, p. 002). Findings support the usefulness of this intervention model to reduce modifiable stroke risk factors, increase knowledge related to stroke signs/symptoms and stroke risk factors and decrease depression for diverse racial backgrounds. AN: MN030290 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:56:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:56:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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