Mothers with Chronic Illness and their Spouse/Partner: Uncertainty, Family Hardiness and Psychological Wellbeing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160431
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mothers with Chronic Illness and their Spouse/Partner: Uncertainty, Family Hardiness and Psychological Wellbeing
Abstract:
Mothers with Chronic Illness and their Spouse/Partner: Uncertainty, Family Hardiness and Psychological Wellbeing
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Noreuil, Margaret
Contact Address:SON, 5414 Hillside Court, McFarland, WI, 53558, USA
Co-Authors:Marilyn McCubbin
Mothers with chronic illness are expected to manage their chronic illness and continue to manage family and work obligations. More women today simultaneously occupy three social roles: parent, spouse/partner, and wage earner. Managing these three roles is difficult for healthy mothers; for mothers living with chronic illness, it may be impossible. The purposes of this cross sectional correlational study were to (1) describe levels of uncertainty, family hardiness, and psychological wellbeing in mothers with chronic illness and their spouse/partner; (2) test for direct and moderating effects of uncertainty and family hardiness on psychological wellbeing in mothers and their spouse/partner; (3) examine the relationship between mothers' uncertainty and family hardiness on the spouse/partners' psychological wellbeing and the relationship between spouse/partners' uncertainty and family hardiness on the mothers' psychological wellbeing and (4) examine how mothers and their spouse/partner manage the uncertainty of chronic illness. Family Systems Theory (Whitechurch & Constantine, 1993) and The Resiliency Model of Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation (McCubbin & McCubbin, 1996) served as theoretical frameworks. Families with a mother living with chronic illness and at least one child under the age of 18 living at home were eligible for participation. Sixty mothers and 30 spouse/partners participated in the study. For mothers, uncertainty and family hardiness were significant predictors of mothers' wellbeing. For fathers, only family hardiness was a significant predictor of fathers' wellbeing. No moderating effects were found for uncertainty and family hardiness on the psychological wellbeing of mothers and their spouse/partner. Mothers' family hardiness was a significant predictor of fathers' wellbeing. For the spouse/partner, neither family hardiness nor uncertainty were significant predictors of mother's psychological wellbeing. Content analysis of open ended questions about management of uncertainty indicated that maintaining control over their lives was important for mothers. Maintaining a sense of "normalcy" in their families' lives was important for mothers and their spouse/partner. Implications for family nursing research and practice will be included in the presentation. AN: MN030227
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMothers with Chronic Illness and their Spouse/Partner: Uncertainty, Family Hardiness and Psychological Wellbeingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160431-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mothers with Chronic Illness and their Spouse/Partner: Uncertainty, Family Hardiness and Psychological Wellbeing </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Noreuil, Margaret</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 5414 Hillside Court, McFarland, WI, 53558, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marilyn McCubbin </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Mothers with chronic illness are expected to manage their chronic illness and continue to manage family and work obligations. More women today simultaneously occupy three social roles: parent, spouse/partner, and wage earner. Managing these three roles is difficult for healthy mothers; for mothers living with chronic illness, it may be impossible. The purposes of this cross sectional correlational study were to (1) describe levels of uncertainty, family hardiness, and psychological wellbeing in mothers with chronic illness and their spouse/partner; (2) test for direct and moderating effects of uncertainty and family hardiness on psychological wellbeing in mothers and their spouse/partner; (3) examine the relationship between mothers' uncertainty and family hardiness on the spouse/partners' psychological wellbeing and the relationship between spouse/partners' uncertainty and family hardiness on the mothers' psychological wellbeing and (4) examine how mothers and their spouse/partner manage the uncertainty of chronic illness. Family Systems Theory (Whitechurch &amp; Constantine, 1993) and The Resiliency Model of Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation (McCubbin &amp; McCubbin, 1996) served as theoretical frameworks. Families with a mother living with chronic illness and at least one child under the age of 18 living at home were eligible for participation. Sixty mothers and 30 spouse/partners participated in the study. For mothers, uncertainty and family hardiness were significant predictors of mothers' wellbeing. For fathers, only family hardiness was a significant predictor of fathers' wellbeing. No moderating effects were found for uncertainty and family hardiness on the psychological wellbeing of mothers and their spouse/partner. Mothers' family hardiness was a significant predictor of fathers' wellbeing. For the spouse/partner, neither family hardiness nor uncertainty were significant predictors of mother's psychological wellbeing. Content analysis of open ended questions about management of uncertainty indicated that maintaining control over their lives was important for mothers. Maintaining a sense of &quot;normalcy&quot; in their families' lives was important for mothers and their spouse/partner. Implications for family nursing research and practice will be included in the presentation. AN: MN030227 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:56:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:56:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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