2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160434
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Racism on Hypertension among African Americans
Abstract:
Impact of Racism on Hypertension among African Americans
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Peters , Rosalind
Contact Address:CON, 5557 Cass Ave, Room 358, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of racism on blood pressure (BP) among African Americans. A mid-range theory of Chronic Stress Emotions derived from Lazarus’ work provided the theoretical framework for this study. Racism was conceptualized as a chronic stressor, with the level of anger, anger expression, and emotional processing influencing the impact of racism on BP. Participants were 162 community-dwelling urban African Americans, 18 to 80 years of age. Measurements included the Racism and Life Experiences Scales, Krieger Racial Discrimination Measure, Emotional Approach to Coping Scale, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory–2, State-Trait Personality Inventory, and automated measures of systolic and diastolic BP. Latent variable SEM analysis was conducted to test the hypothesized model, additional analysis of racism specific data was done using multiple regression and correlational techniques. Experience of racism was assessed in seven major categories of everyday living: 83% of subjects reported experiencing unfair treatment in at least one area; over 40% reported experiencing them in all seven areas; 68% of the subjects reported discrimination when getting medical care, and 31% of the subjects reported that they accepted discrimination as a fact of life. Significant age-related differences were noted, with older subjects (> 40 years of age) experiencing greater racial discrimination, greater chronic stress, greater rates of hypertension, and they were more likely to control anger inward. Age was found to moderate the racism and hypertension relationship, and the effects of racism on hypertension can not be understood apart from age. Racism is a ubiquitous experience for African Americans. Its impact on BP is moderated by factors such as age, and expression and control of anger. Additional analysis of positive coping strategies is warranted to better assist African Americans, especially older persons, in managing the health ramifications of discriminatory treatment. AN: MN030196
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Racism on Hypertension among African Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160434-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of Racism on Hypertension among African Americans </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Peters , Rosalind</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 5557 Cass Ave, Room 358, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of racism on blood pressure (BP) among African Americans. A mid-range theory of Chronic Stress Emotions derived from Lazarus&rsquo; work provided the theoretical framework for this study. Racism was conceptualized as a chronic stressor, with the level of anger, anger expression, and emotional processing influencing the impact of racism on BP. Participants were 162 community-dwelling urban African Americans, 18 to 80 years of age. Measurements included the Racism and Life Experiences Scales, Krieger Racial Discrimination Measure, Emotional Approach to Coping Scale, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory&ndash;2, State-Trait Personality Inventory, and automated measures of systolic and diastolic BP. Latent variable SEM analysis was conducted to test the hypothesized model, additional analysis of racism specific data was done using multiple regression and correlational techniques. Experience of racism was assessed in seven major categories of everyday living: 83% of subjects reported experiencing unfair treatment in at least one area; over 40% reported experiencing them in all seven areas; 68% of the subjects reported discrimination when getting medical care, and 31% of the subjects reported that they accepted discrimination as a fact of life. Significant age-related differences were noted, with older subjects (&gt; 40 years of age) experiencing greater racial discrimination, greater chronic stress, greater rates of hypertension, and they were more likely to control anger inward. Age was found to moderate the racism and hypertension relationship, and the effects of racism on hypertension can not be understood apart from age. Racism is a ubiquitous experience for African Americans. Its impact on BP is moderated by factors such as age, and expression and control of anger. Additional analysis of positive coping strategies is warranted to better assist African Americans, especially older persons, in managing the health ramifications of discriminatory treatment. AN: MN030196 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:56:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:56:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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