21.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160436
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Barriers to lead screening: parental perspective
Abstract:
Barriers to lead screening: parental perspective
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Polivka, Barbara
Contact Address:CON, 1585 Neil Avenue , Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Co-Authors:Dayle Darr; Mary Gottesman
Screening for lead poisoning in children receiving Medicaid is federally mandated at ages 12 and 24 months, yet only about one-third of Ohio’s eligible children are screened. The purpose of this study was to determine barriers to blood lead screening sources of lead poisoning prevention education from the perspectives of parents of young children receiving Medicaid. Data were collected via three focus groups and a mailed survey of a random sample of parents. Focus group participants (n=30) appeared confused about sources of lead poisoning and methods of removing lead from the environment. Many were aware of the risk factors, but relied on providers to initiate screening. Barriers to screening included inaccessibility to screening sites such as laboratories, not having a blood lead test in WIC clinics along with other blood tests, pain and discomfort associated with blood draws, and confusion about when to have the screening. Survey respondents (n=143) were primarily white (77%), female (99%), with at least a high school education (80%). About half of the respondents (58%) reported their child had been lead screened. Identified barriers to lead screening included not being told their child needed a blood lead test (59%), not knowing the test was important (33%), and not knowing where to go for the test done (17%). Fifty-six percent of the respondents recalled receiving information about lead poisoning. Information was obtained primarily from their child’s physician or nurse (59%), the health department or WIC (57%), or a family member/friend (20%). Most respondents reported they wanted to receive lead poisoning information via brochures/pamphlets (73%), from a physician /nurse (45%), TV (36%), or videos (28%). This study has implications for community health and pediatric nursing to develop innovative interventions to increase blood lead screening and lead poisoning prevention education. AN: MN030091
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBarriers to lead screening: parental perspectiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160436-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Barriers to lead screening: parental perspective </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Polivka, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 1585 Neil Avenue , Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dayle Darr; Mary Gottesman</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Screening for lead poisoning in children receiving Medicaid is federally mandated at ages 12 and 24 months, yet only about one-third of Ohio&rsquo;s eligible children are screened. The purpose of this study was to determine barriers to blood lead screening sources of lead poisoning prevention education from the perspectives of parents of young children receiving Medicaid. Data were collected via three focus groups and a mailed survey of a random sample of parents. Focus group participants (n=30) appeared confused about sources of lead poisoning and methods of removing lead from the environment. Many were aware of the risk factors, but relied on providers to initiate screening. Barriers to screening included inaccessibility to screening sites such as laboratories, not having a blood lead test in WIC clinics along with other blood tests, pain and discomfort associated with blood draws, and confusion about when to have the screening. Survey respondents (n=143) were primarily white (77%), female (99%), with at least a high school education (80%). About half of the respondents (58%) reported their child had been lead screened. Identified barriers to lead screening included not being told their child needed a blood lead test (59%), not knowing the test was important (33%), and not knowing where to go for the test done (17%). Fifty-six percent of the respondents recalled receiving information about lead poisoning. Information was obtained primarily from their child&rsquo;s physician or nurse (59%), the health department or WIC (57%), or a family member/friend (20%). Most respondents reported they wanted to receive lead poisoning information via brochures/pamphlets (73%), from a physician /nurse (45%), TV (36%), or videos (28%). This study has implications for community health and pediatric nursing to develop innovative interventions to increase blood lead screening and lead poisoning prevention education. AN: MN030091 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:56:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:56:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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