2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160437
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strategy to Improve Blood Pressure Control and Medication Adherence
Abstract:
Strategy to Improve Blood Pressure Control and Medication Adherence
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Powell, Kathryn
Contact Address:Nursing Service, 931-B North Racine, Chicago, IL, 60622, USA
Approximately 50 million Americans have hypertension and more than two-thirds have inadequate control of their blood pressure. One of the major causes of uncontrolled hypertension is the lack of adherence to medications. The Patient Empowerment Readiness Model (PERM) is a strategy to improve medication adherence that matches the patient’s stage of change with specific interventions. The PERM helps the patient identify problematic behavior, advantages and disadvantages of change, barriers to change, strategies to overcome barriers, and specific plans for change or to prevent relapse. The purpose of this randomized controlled study was to determine whether the PERM intervention improved blood pressure control and medication adherence and whether advancement in the stage of change improved blood pressure control. Subjects in the experimental group received the PERM intervention at baseline, one-month and three-month follow-up visits. Subjects in the control group received usual care at the same intervals. The average blood pressure improved for both groups throughout the study, however, SBP remained above the recommended goal. The experimental group (n=25) had a statistically significant change in both SBP (-4.64 mm Hg) and DBP (-4.96 mm Hg) from the second to third visit as compared to the control group. Medication adherence slightly improved in both groups, however medication adherence was not correlated with change in blood pressure. Advancement in the stage of change for medication adherence also did not correlate with change in blood pressure. However, almost two-thirds of the subjects were in the higher levels of the stages of change for medication adherence at baseline and the study time frame did not allow for advancement. In conclusion, blood pressure improved in subjects who received the PERM intervention. Since self-reported medication adherence was high throughout the study, we cannot suggest that better blood pressure control occurred through improved adherence. AN: MN030045
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrategy to Improve Blood Pressure Control and Medication Adherenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160437-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Strategy to Improve Blood Pressure Control and Medication Adherence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Powell, Kathryn</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Service, 931-B North Racine, Chicago, IL, 60622, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Approximately 50 million Americans have hypertension and more than two-thirds have inadequate control of their blood pressure. One of the major causes of uncontrolled hypertension is the lack of adherence to medications. The Patient Empowerment Readiness Model (PERM) is a strategy to improve medication adherence that matches the patient&rsquo;s stage of change with specific interventions. The PERM helps the patient identify problematic behavior, advantages and disadvantages of change, barriers to change, strategies to overcome barriers, and specific plans for change or to prevent relapse. The purpose of this randomized controlled study was to determine whether the PERM intervention improved blood pressure control and medication adherence and whether advancement in the stage of change improved blood pressure control. Subjects in the experimental group received the PERM intervention at baseline, one-month and three-month follow-up visits. Subjects in the control group received usual care at the same intervals. The average blood pressure improved for both groups throughout the study, however, SBP remained above the recommended goal. The experimental group (n=25) had a statistically significant change in both SBP (-4.64 mm Hg) and DBP (-4.96 mm Hg) from the second to third visit as compared to the control group. Medication adherence slightly improved in both groups, however medication adherence was not correlated with change in blood pressure. Advancement in the stage of change for medication adherence also did not correlate with change in blood pressure. However, almost two-thirds of the subjects were in the higher levels of the stages of change for medication adherence at baseline and the study time frame did not allow for advancement. In conclusion, blood pressure improved in subjects who received the PERM intervention. Since self-reported medication adherence was high throughout the study, we cannot suggest that better blood pressure control occurred through improved adherence. AN: MN030045 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:56:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:56:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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