Energy Needs of Preterm Infants: What Difference do Maturity, Growth, and Lung Disease Make?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160439
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Energy Needs of Preterm Infants: What Difference do Maturity, Growth, and Lung Disease Make?
Abstract:
Energy Needs of Preterm Infants: What Difference do Maturity, Growth, and Lung Disease Make?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Pridham, Karen
Contact Address:CON, 600 Highland Ave, MS 2455, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Co-Authors:Janine M. Bamberger; Christopher Green; Abhik Bhattacharya
Knowledge of the energy needs of infants weighing < 1500 g at birth and appropriate size for gestational age is needed to support growth. In theory, an infant’s post-conceptional age (PCA), rate of weight gain, and inflammatory processes associated with lung disease increase energy need. Little is known about how a history of infant respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) without chronic lung disease sequelae, in combination with maturity at birth (gestational age), PCA at transition to full nipple feeding, and rate of weight gain affect this need. Indirect calorimetry was used to assess total energy expenditure (EE) for 11 nipple-feeding preterm infants (6 with and 5 without RDS history) in 1 – 6 studies each (total=14 for RDS group; 22 for non-RDS group). Nine infants were African American; 5 were female. Rate of weight gain was estimated by dividing total gain by days of age. Collinearity of maturity, growth, and lung disease predictor variables was examined. The generalized linear mixed model, which was used to explore the contribution of predictor variables to total energy expenditure, was significant [F(4,31)=7.77, p <.001], and accounted for 50% of the variance in energy expended. All variables except gestational age made a significant (p < .05) contribution. Energy need increased as infant age from conception increased and as their rate of weight gain increased. Infants with RDS history had, on average, significantly higher EE (mean=80.7; SD=6.3 vs. mean=70.4, SD=8.7 kcal/kg/day, t=3.81, p=<.001) and were, on average, significantly older at EE assessment (mean=34.8 weeks, SD=.9 vs mean=32.9 weeks, SD=.9; p < .001). The higher EE of infants recovered from acute RDS warrants nurse and dietitian attention to energy supply and conservation measures and further study with a larger sample and for an extended time of vulnerability to poor growth. AN: MN030152
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnergy Needs of Preterm Infants: What Difference do Maturity, Growth, and Lung Disease Make?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160439-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Energy Needs of Preterm Infants: What Difference do Maturity, Growth, and Lung Disease Make? </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pridham, Karen</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 600 Highland Ave, MS 2455, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Janine M. Bamberger; Christopher Green; Abhik Bhattacharya </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Knowledge of the energy needs of infants weighing &lt; 1500 g at birth and appropriate size for gestational age is needed to support growth. In theory, an infant&rsquo;s post-conceptional age (PCA), rate of weight gain, and inflammatory processes associated with lung disease increase energy need. Little is known about how a history of infant respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) without chronic lung disease sequelae, in combination with maturity at birth (gestational age), PCA at transition to full nipple feeding, and rate of weight gain affect this need. Indirect calorimetry was used to assess total energy expenditure (EE) for 11 nipple-feeding preterm infants (6 with and 5 without RDS history) in 1 &ndash; 6 studies each (total=14 for RDS group; 22 for non-RDS group). Nine infants were African American; 5 were female. Rate of weight gain was estimated by dividing total gain by days of age. Collinearity of maturity, growth, and lung disease predictor variables was examined. The generalized linear mixed model, which was used to explore the contribution of predictor variables to total energy expenditure, was significant [F(4,31)=7.77, p &lt;.001], and accounted for 50% of the variance in energy expended. All variables except gestational age made a significant (p &lt; .05) contribution. Energy need increased as infant age from conception increased and as their rate of weight gain increased. Infants with RDS history had, on average, significantly higher EE (mean=80.7; SD=6.3 vs. mean=70.4, SD=8.7 kcal/kg/day, t=3.81, p=&lt;.001) and were, on average, significantly older at EE assessment (mean=34.8 weeks, SD=.9 vs mean=32.9 weeks, SD=.9; p &lt; .001). The higher EE of infants recovered from acute RDS warrants nurse and dietitian attention to energy supply and conservation measures and further study with a larger sample and for an extended time of vulnerability to poor growth. AN: MN030152 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:56:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:56:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.