2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160440
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Resistance Exercise Training in Type 2 Diabetes
Abstract:
Resistance Exercise Training in Type 2 Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Quinn, Laurie
Contact Address:College of Nursing , USA
Theoretical Framework: Aerobic exercise enhances glucose transport into muscle and improves insulin sensitivity. Resistance-exercise is associated with increased muscular strength and physical endurance, factors that should result in improved insulin sensitivity. Purpose: The purpose of this ongoing pilot study was to examine the effects of 12 weeks of 3 times weekly resistance-exercise training (moderate-intensity, high-volume) in obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Specifically this study examined resistance exercise training on insulin sensitivity, as measured by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) along with muscular strength and endurance. Subjects: This study include 4 obese (101.31 ± 8.1 kg) (mean and SEM) Hispanic (n=2) and Caucasian (n=2) men (n=2) and women (n=2) with type 2 diabetes. Subjects were middle-aged (49.25 ± 0. 75 years) with a duration of diabetes < 7 years. Methods: Subjects participated in a 12-week supervised resistance-exercise training program using equipment that included nine upper and lower body Life Fitness (Franklin Park, IL) weight-training machines Measurements of insulin sensitivity and muscular strength were made before and after training. Results: Nonsignificant declines in fasting glucose (139.6 ± 29.18 vs.128 ± 30.43 mg/dl) and insulin resistance (103.73 ± 43.00 vs. 75.50 ± 17.54) (HOMA-calculation)) from pre to post-training were noted. There were significant improvements in muscular strength as measured by pre to post training changes in weight loads on the lateral pull down (106.66 ± 21.85 vs.140 ± 27.83 lbs; p<.03), leg curl (145 ± 32.78 vs.180 ± 38.18 lbs. p<.02), seated row (100.00 ± 26.45 vs.140 ± 23.62 lbs. p<.005), bench press (71.66 ± 11.66 vs.100 ± 16.07 p<.04) and shoulder press (80.00 ± 17.32 vs.101.66 ± 17.40lbs. p<.006) machines. Conclusions: This study was limited by its small sample size, however, there were post-training directional improvements in fasting blood glucose and insulin sensitivity. In addition, improvements in muscle strength were noted after 12 weeks of training. Preliminary evidence suggests resistance training may be an option for nurses to promote in patients with type 2 diabetes. AN: MN030310
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResistance Exercise Training in Type 2 Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160440-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Resistance Exercise Training in Type 2 Diabetes </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Quinn, Laurie</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing , USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Theoretical Framework: Aerobic exercise enhances glucose transport into muscle and improves insulin sensitivity. Resistance-exercise is associated with increased muscular strength and physical endurance, factors that should result in improved insulin sensitivity. Purpose: The purpose of this ongoing pilot study was to examine the effects of 12 weeks of 3 times weekly resistance-exercise training (moderate-intensity, high-volume) in obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Specifically this study examined resistance exercise training on insulin sensitivity, as measured by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) along with muscular strength and endurance. Subjects: This study include 4 obese (101.31 &plusmn; 8.1 kg) (mean and SEM) Hispanic (n=2) and Caucasian (n=2) men (n=2) and women (n=2) with type 2 diabetes. Subjects were middle-aged (49.25 &plusmn; 0. 75 years) with a duration of diabetes &lt; 7 years. Methods: Subjects participated in a 12-week supervised resistance-exercise training program using equipment that included nine upper and lower body Life Fitness (Franklin Park, IL) weight-training machines Measurements of insulin sensitivity and muscular strength were made before and after training. Results: Nonsignificant declines in fasting glucose (139.6 &plusmn; 29.18 vs.128 &plusmn; 30.43 mg/dl) and insulin resistance (103.73 &plusmn; 43.00 vs. 75.50 &plusmn; 17.54) (HOMA-calculation)) from pre to post-training were noted. There were significant improvements in muscular strength as measured by pre to post training changes in weight loads on the lateral pull down (106.66 &plusmn; 21.85 vs.140 &plusmn; 27.83 lbs; p&lt;.03), leg curl (145 &plusmn; 32.78 vs.180 &plusmn; 38.18 lbs. p&lt;.02), seated row (100.00 &plusmn; 26.45 vs.140 &plusmn; 23.62 lbs. p&lt;.005), bench press (71.66 &plusmn; 11.66 vs.100 &plusmn; 16.07 p&lt;.04) and shoulder press (80.00 &plusmn; 17.32 vs.101.66 &plusmn; 17.40lbs. p&lt;.006) machines. Conclusions: This study was limited by its small sample size, however, there were post-training directional improvements in fasting blood glucose and insulin sensitivity. In addition, improvements in muscle strength were noted after 12 weeks of training. Preliminary evidence suggests resistance training may be an option for nurses to promote in patients with type 2 diabetes. AN: MN030310 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:56:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:56:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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