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Virginia Henderson International Nursing e-Repository > Registry of Nursing Research Conference Abstracts > MNRS - Midwest Nursing Research Society > Application of Precede-Proceed Health Promotion Planning Model for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction Efforts among Law Enforcement Officers

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160441
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Type: Presentation
Title: Application of Precede-Proceed Health Promotion Planning Model for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction Efforts among Law Enforcement Officers
Abstract: 
Application of Precede-Proceed Health Promotion Planning Model for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction Efforts among Law Enforcement Officers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Ramey, Sandra
Contact Address:Division of Nursing, 1200 Grandview Avenue, Des Moines, IA, 50316, USA
Co-Authors:Greg Welk; Warren Franke
Purpose: It remains uncertain whether law enforcement officers (LEOs) have an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and, if so, the extent to which stress affects this relationship. Conceptual Framework: This study used triangulation of data from several sources. The Precede-Proceed community-based health promotion planning approach to chronic disease prevention was applied using a target population of law enforcement officers (LEOs) employed by Departments of Public Safety (DPS) in nine Midwestern states. Methods: A qualitative (inductive) approach was used in an attempt to understand and explain the perception of health as embraced by the LEOs. Quantitative methodology was also employed. Subjects: The self-reported incidence of CVD and CVD risk factors among 2,818 currently employed male LEOs was compared to 9,650 male respondents to the 1999 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Results: The percentage for CVD incidence was lower in the LEO group than among the general population [2.3 (SD=.15) vs. 5.6 (SD=.23); p=.001]. The best predictor variables for CVD in the combined group were: physical inactivity (p=.015), hypertension (p=.001), and hypercholesterolemia (p=.001). In the LEO group, the best predictor variables for CVD were: perceived stress (p=.032), time in the profession (p=.001), and hypertension (p=.001). The prevalence of hypercholesterolemia (33.2 percent), weight (82.6 percent; BMI > 25.0), and tobacco use (10.1 percent) in the LEO group exceeded those found in the general population. Stress was significantly associated with CVD (p=.008) Conclusions: These results suggest that stress may contribute to CVD among LEOs through potentiating several CVD risk factors. Results indicate that organizational stress is clearly an issue within the DPS, and that the organizational environment appears to contribute to the stress perceived by the LEOs. Social and environmental intervention strategies are offered to promote the overall health of the LEOs. AN: MN030086
Repository Posting Date: 26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication: 17-Oct-2011
Sponsors: Midwest Nursing Research Society
Appears in Collections: MNRS - Midwest Nursing Research Society

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