2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160442
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Organized Medicine's Perspective of Nursing: A Review of JAMA, 1883-1935
Abstract:
Organized Medicine's Perspective of Nursing: A Review of JAMA, 1883-1935
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Robertson, Julie
Contact Address:SON, 1240 Normal Road, DeKalb, IL, 60115, USA
Co-Authors:Brigid Lusk
With the advent of formal nursing preparation in the U.S., physicians welcomed the presence of educated nurses at their side. Yet nurses and physicians subsequently demonstrated discord on issues such as jurisdiction of practice and professional autonomy. The purpose of this historical study was to explore and analyze the development of this attitudinal change through literature appearing in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) from 1883 to 1935. No studies were identified which described the views of organized medicine towards nursing during this significant period in their professional histories. All issues of JAMA, organ of the American Medical Association (AMA), from its inception in 1883 until the peak of the 1930s economic depression, were reviewed for references to nursing. External events, such as the increased cost of medical care with the concomitant threat of socialized medicine, provided the framework through which references to nursing were interpreted. All JAMA editorials, research articles, correspondence, and news items related to trained nursing, were reviewed using historical methodology. The papers of founding editor Nathan Davis and early AMA documents were also examined. Secondary sources included histories of nursing and medicine, as well as contemporary published literature. We concluded that in the 1880s organized medicine warmly welcomed trained nurses although assumption of medical control over nursing education was tacitly implied. Through the 1890s and 1900s, amidst a storm of literature exposing and lamenting medical education and medicine's low status, opposition to well-educated nurses developed. As the costs of medical care became a contentious issue, nurses' fees were discussed. As medical education became more exclusive, nurses' subordinate role was delineated. As doctors' concerns related to health insurance increased, the "nursing problem" became less evident in JAMA. This research illustrated the complexity and interdependent nature of early professional relations between nursing and medicine. AN: MN030246
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOrganized Medicine's Perspective of Nursing: A Review of JAMA, 1883-1935en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160442-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Organized Medicine's Perspective of Nursing: A Review of JAMA, 1883-1935</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Robertson, Julie</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1240 Normal Road, DeKalb, IL, 60115, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Brigid Lusk</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">With the advent of formal nursing preparation in the U.S., physicians welcomed the presence of educated nurses at their side. Yet nurses and physicians subsequently demonstrated discord on issues such as jurisdiction of practice and professional autonomy. The purpose of this historical study was to explore and analyze the development of this attitudinal change through literature appearing in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) from 1883 to 1935. No studies were identified which described the views of organized medicine towards nursing during this significant period in their professional histories. All issues of JAMA, organ of the American Medical Association (AMA), from its inception in 1883 until the peak of the 1930s economic depression, were reviewed for references to nursing. External events, such as the increased cost of medical care with the concomitant threat of socialized medicine, provided the framework through which references to nursing were interpreted. All JAMA editorials, research articles, correspondence, and news items related to trained nursing, were reviewed using historical methodology. The papers of founding editor Nathan Davis and early AMA documents were also examined. Secondary sources included histories of nursing and medicine, as well as contemporary published literature. We concluded that in the 1880s organized medicine warmly welcomed trained nurses although assumption of medical control over nursing education was tacitly implied. Through the 1890s and 1900s, amidst a storm of literature exposing and lamenting medical education and medicine's low status, opposition to well-educated nurses developed. As the costs of medical care became a contentious issue, nurses' fees were discussed. As medical education became more exclusive, nurses' subordinate role was delineated. As doctors' concerns related to health insurance increased, the &quot;nursing problem&quot; became less evident in JAMA. This research illustrated the complexity and interdependent nature of early professional relations between nursing and medicine. AN: MN030246 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:56:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:56:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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