2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160445
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perinatal Death of a Grandchild: the Lived Experience of Registered Nurses
Abstract:
Perinatal Death of a Grandchild: the Lived Experience of Registered Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Roth-Sautter, Constance
Contact Address:SON, 3015 Arlington Avenue, Collier Building, Toledo, OH, 43614-5803, USA
Co-Authors:Judith A. Anderson; Ruth R. Alteneder
The psychological and physical consequences of early perinatal loss on women and their partners have been investigated. Supportive nursing interventions have been developed and tested. However, research has not been published about the effect of perinatal loss on extended family members, particularly the prospective grandparents. Registered nurses in the dual role of mother and professional bring their practice experiences of loss to their family members' experience of loss and grief. This phenomenological study investigated the lived experience of registered nurse mothers whose daughter or daughter-in-law has experienced an early perinatal loss. Believing that loss and grief require adaptive responses, Roy's Adaptation Model provided the theoretical framework for the study. A purposive sample of eight participants was interviewed using audio recordings. Data was analyzed using Colaizzi's method. Three clusters of themes were extracted from the data: announcement of pregnancy, loss of the baby, and the long term. Announcement of pregnancy includes themes of excitement and joy, and underlying fear. Loss of the baby contains themes of being there, incredible sadness, help with decisions, helplessness, and facing the inevitable. The long term themes are solace from others, affirmative activities, and vivid memories. The presentation will conclude with implications for nurses as they care for parents and grandparents experiencing perinatal loss. Recommendations for further research on this phenomenon will be considered. AN: MN030262
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerinatal Death of a Grandchild: the Lived Experience of Registered Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160445-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perinatal Death of a Grandchild: the Lived Experience of Registered Nurses </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Roth-Sautter, Constance</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 3015 Arlington Avenue, Collier Building, Toledo, OH, 43614-5803, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith A. Anderson; Ruth R. Alteneder</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The psychological and physical consequences of early perinatal loss on women and their partners have been investigated. Supportive nursing interventions have been developed and tested. However, research has not been published about the effect of perinatal loss on extended family members, particularly the prospective grandparents. Registered nurses in the dual role of mother and professional bring their practice experiences of loss to their family members' experience of loss and grief. This phenomenological study investigated the lived experience of registered nurse mothers whose daughter or daughter-in-law has experienced an early perinatal loss. Believing that loss and grief require adaptive responses, Roy's Adaptation Model provided the theoretical framework for the study. A purposive sample of eight participants was interviewed using audio recordings. Data was analyzed using Colaizzi's method. Three clusters of themes were extracted from the data: announcement of pregnancy, loss of the baby, and the long term. Announcement of pregnancy includes themes of excitement and joy, and underlying fear. Loss of the baby contains themes of being there, incredible sadness, help with decisions, helplessness, and facing the inevitable. The long term themes are solace from others, affirmative activities, and vivid memories. The presentation will conclude with implications for nurses as they care for parents and grandparents experiencing perinatal loss. Recommendations for further research on this phenomenon will be considered. AN: MN030262 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:57:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:57:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.