2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160446
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural and Health Beliefs in Mammography Screening
Abstract:
Cultural and Health Beliefs in Mammography Screening
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Russell, Kathleen
P.I. Institution Name:IUPUI
Contact Address:SON, 1111 W. Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202-5107, USA
Various ethnic groups have lower initiated and regular mammography screening participation than Caucasian women. Culture may have an important role in this irregular use since some communities of color hold culturally-specific beliefs about breast cancer. Although research shows that health beliefs are predictive of breast cancer screening behavior, little is known about the relationship of cultural beliefs and health beliefs with mammography screening. The purpose of this study was to (1) determine if cultural beliefs differed by race, education, and income, and (2) determine the relationship between cultural beliefs, health beliefs, race, education, and income with mammography screening adherence. The cultural assessment model for health and the health belief model guided this correlational study. The sample consisted of 111 African-American and 64 non-Hispanic Caucasian women recruited from community organizations and public housing. Russell's personal space, temporal orientation, and personal control scales and Powe's cancer fatalism scale measured cultural beliefs. Health beliefs were measured by Champion's breast cancer susceptibility, benefits, barriers and self-efficacy scales. Results indicated black women held a higher fatalistic view than white women. Less educated and lower income women had more space discomfort during the screening procedure, were less future oriented in finding health problems early, had less internal control and more external control over early disease detection, and were more fatalistic about cancer. Logistic regression analysis showed that women with less space discomfort, a higher prevention orientation, less internal control, and fewer barriers to screening were more likely to be mammography adherent. Race, education, and income were not significant. Study findings provide greater understanding of cultural dimensions of mammography screening for developing tailored interventions for both African-American and Caucasian women. AN: MN030115
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural and Health Beliefs in Mammography Screeningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160446-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cultural and Health Beliefs in Mammography Screening </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Russell, Kathleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">IUPUI</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1111 W. Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202-5107, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Various ethnic groups have lower initiated and regular mammography screening participation than Caucasian women. Culture may have an important role in this irregular use since some communities of color hold culturally-specific beliefs about breast cancer. Although research shows that health beliefs are predictive of breast cancer screening behavior, little is known about the relationship of cultural beliefs and health beliefs with mammography screening. The purpose of this study was to (1) determine if cultural beliefs differed by race, education, and income, and (2) determine the relationship between cultural beliefs, health beliefs, race, education, and income with mammography screening adherence. The cultural assessment model for health and the health belief model guided this correlational study. The sample consisted of 111 African-American and 64 non-Hispanic Caucasian women recruited from community organizations and public housing. Russell's personal space, temporal orientation, and personal control scales and Powe's cancer fatalism scale measured cultural beliefs. Health beliefs were measured by Champion's breast cancer susceptibility, benefits, barriers and self-efficacy scales. Results indicated black women held a higher fatalistic view than white women. Less educated and lower income women had more space discomfort during the screening procedure, were less future oriented in finding health problems early, had less internal control and more external control over early disease detection, and were more fatalistic about cancer. Logistic regression analysis showed that women with less space discomfort, a higher prevention orientation, less internal control, and fewer barriers to screening were more likely to be mammography adherent. Race, education, and income were not significant. Study findings provide greater understanding of cultural dimensions of mammography screening for developing tailored interventions for both African-American and Caucasian women. AN: MN030115 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:57:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:57:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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