Lessons Learned in Describing Nursing Effectiveness through Standardized Nursing Languages and Computerized Clinical Data

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160448
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Lessons Learned in Describing Nursing Effectiveness through Standardized Nursing Languages and Computerized Clinical Data
Abstract:
Lessons Learned in Describing Nursing Effectiveness through Standardized Nursing Languages and Computerized Clinical Data
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Scherb, Cindy
Contact Address:CON, 4430 State Hwy 22, Kiester, MN, 56051, USA
The purpose of this descriptive exploratory study was to analyze patient data recorded by nurses within a computerized documentation system using the standardized nursing languages of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA), the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC), and the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC). This study is significant because: 1) procedures for how this important research can be accomplished with clinical nursing datasets that include standardized nursing languages are demonstrated and evaluated, and 2) the relationship among nursing interventions and patient outcomes are risk adjusted using selected patient characteristics. The sample included 189 records of patients admitted with pneumonia, 120 with congestive heart failure, and 257 with a total joint replacement (TJR) from January 1, 1999 – December 31, 1999. A repeated measure MANCOVA was used to analyze the effect of nursing interventions on the five most prevalent outcomes for each of the 3 populations. The dependent variables were the outcome ratings from admission and discharge. Independent variables were the interventions associated with each outcome, gender, the 3 most frequent comorbid conditions for that population, and the first acuity rating. Age was a covariate. Nursing interventions that were statistically significant for patients in the Pneumonia population were Oxygen Therapy and Family Involvement. Statistically significant nursing interventions for patients with CHF were Oxygen Therapy, Anxiety Reduction, and Gastrointestinal Surveillance. The interventions of Multidisciplinary Care Conference, Orthopedic Appliance, and Tube Care: Urinary were shown to have a statistically significant effect for patients in the TJR population. Conclusions from this study reveal the need to expand risk adjustment variables, to use a variety of methods to analyze the effect of interventions on patient outcomes, and the necessity of conducting effectiveness research across the care continuum. These conclusions will be discussed more in depth as well as the implications for practice, education, and policy formation. AN: MN030211
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLessons Learned in Describing Nursing Effectiveness through Standardized Nursing Languages and Computerized Clinical Dataen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160448-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Lessons Learned in Describing Nursing Effectiveness through Standardized Nursing Languages and Computerized Clinical Data </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scherb, Cindy</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 4430 State Hwy 22, Kiester, MN, 56051, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this descriptive exploratory study was to analyze patient data recorded by nurses within a computerized documentation system using the standardized nursing languages of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA), the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC), and the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC). This study is significant because: 1) procedures for how this important research can be accomplished with clinical nursing datasets that include standardized nursing languages are demonstrated and evaluated, and 2) the relationship among nursing interventions and patient outcomes are risk adjusted using selected patient characteristics. The sample included 189 records of patients admitted with pneumonia, 120 with congestive heart failure, and 257 with a total joint replacement (TJR) from January 1, 1999 &ndash; December 31, 1999. A repeated measure MANCOVA was used to analyze the effect of nursing interventions on the five most prevalent outcomes for each of the 3 populations. The dependent variables were the outcome ratings from admission and discharge. Independent variables were the interventions associated with each outcome, gender, the 3 most frequent comorbid conditions for that population, and the first acuity rating. Age was a covariate. Nursing interventions that were statistically significant for patients in the Pneumonia population were Oxygen Therapy and Family Involvement. Statistically significant nursing interventions for patients with CHF were Oxygen Therapy, Anxiety Reduction, and Gastrointestinal Surveillance. The interventions of Multidisciplinary Care Conference, Orthopedic Appliance, and Tube Care: Urinary were shown to have a statistically significant effect for patients in the TJR population. Conclusions from this study reveal the need to expand risk adjustment variables, to use a variety of methods to analyze the effect of interventions on patient outcomes, and the necessity of conducting effectiveness research across the care continuum. These conclusions will be discussed more in depth as well as the implications for practice, education, and policy formation. AN: MN030211 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:57:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:57:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.