2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160453
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physical Trauma in Sexually Assaulted Older Women
Abstract:
Physical Trauma in Sexually Assaulted Older Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Sommers, Marilyn
Contact Address:CON, ML 0038, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA
Co-Authors:John Schafer; Therese Zink
Sexual assault is considered a silent, violent epidemic against women of all ages. We have prospectively investigated genital and non-genital injuries in women examined by our Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) Program since 1998. Purpose: Our primary hypothesis was that age is significantly and positively related to the number of genital and non-genital injuries in women following sexual assault. Conceptual Framework: Physiologic theory suggests that postmenopausal and elderly women are at higher risk for injury after sexual assault than are their younger counterparts because of changes that occur with aging. Subjects: We studied 89 women over 39 years of age (mean age=51.4; SD 14.77; range 40-94) during the study period. Methods: We maintain a Sexual Assault Registry on all individuals examined by the SANEs. Results: At the time of the assault, the survivor described the use of a weapon in 39% of the cases. Vaginal penetration occurred in 73% of the assaults, anal penetration in 20% of the assaults, and oral penetration in 25% of the assaults. Correlation between age and number of genital injuries was r=0.440 (p < 0.001); correlation between age and total injuries was r=0.221 (p=0.038). Women 40-49 (n=61) had a mean of 2.38 total injuries and 0.57 genital injuries. Women over 49 (n=28) had a mean of 3.54 total injuries and a mean of 2.00 genital injuries. Although Black/African American women had fewer genital and total injuries than White/Caucasian women, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: In our sample of women older than 39 years, older women who were raped had higher rates of injury than younger women. Further work is needed to determine the reasons for the higher injury rates among older women. AN: MN030266
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysical Trauma in Sexually Assaulted Older Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160453-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physical Trauma in Sexually Assaulted Older Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sommers, Marilyn</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, ML 0038, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">John Schafer; Therese Zink</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Sexual assault is considered a silent, violent epidemic against women of all ages. We have prospectively investigated genital and non-genital injuries in women examined by our Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) Program since 1998. Purpose: Our primary hypothesis was that age is significantly and positively related to the number of genital and non-genital injuries in women following sexual assault. Conceptual Framework: Physiologic theory suggests that postmenopausal and elderly women are at higher risk for injury after sexual assault than are their younger counterparts because of changes that occur with aging. Subjects: We studied 89 women over 39 years of age (mean age=51.4; SD 14.77; range 40-94) during the study period. Methods: We maintain a Sexual Assault Registry on all individuals examined by the SANEs. Results: At the time of the assault, the survivor described the use of a weapon in 39% of the cases. Vaginal penetration occurred in 73% of the assaults, anal penetration in 20% of the assaults, and oral penetration in 25% of the assaults. Correlation between age and number of genital injuries was r=0.440 (p &lt; 0.001); correlation between age and total injuries was r=0.221 (p=0.038). Women 40-49 (n=61) had a mean of 2.38 total injuries and 0.57 genital injuries. Women over 49 (n=28) had a mean of 3.54 total injuries and a mean of 2.00 genital injuries. Although Black/African American women had fewer genital and total injuries than White/Caucasian women, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: In our sample of women older than 39 years, older women who were raped had higher rates of injury than younger women. Further work is needed to determine the reasons for the higher injury rates among older women. AN: MN030266 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:57:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:57:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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