Gender and Ethnic Subgroup Differences in Preference, Daily Usage, and Familiar Feelings of Ethnic Items

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160454
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender and Ethnic Subgroup Differences in Preference, Daily Usage, and Familiar Feelings of Ethnic Items
Abstract:
Gender and Ethnic Subgroup Differences in Preference, Daily Usage, and Familiar Feelings of Ethnic Items
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Son, Gwi-Ryung
Contact Address:SON, 400 N. Ingalls, Room 2160, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Among immigrant ethnic groups, the critical factors in adjusting in the U.S. appear to be language and cultural differences. The racial and ethnic differences in health behavior of Asian American (AA) subgroups indicate a need for more specific information pertaining to a subgroup than a general group. The purpose of this study was to explore gender and ethnic subgroup differences in preference, daily usage, and familiar feelings of ethnic items among AA. A convenience sample of 193 AA (Korean: 85; Chinese: 23; Asian Indian: 37; Taiwanese: 48) was recruited from Michigan and Ohio. Males showed significantly higher level of perceived language ability in English than females. Although there was no difference in educational level among subgroups, KA were the youngest and the shortest stayed in the U.S. and they showed the lowest level of perceived language ability in English. There were no subgroup differences in total preference, but significant group differences were found in daily usage and familiar feelings of ethnic items, especially ethnic clothes, foods, and objects. Health professionals and policy makers should consider ethnicity while planning and developing culturally sensitive and effective health programs. AN: MN030178
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender and Ethnic Subgroup Differences in Preference, Daily Usage, and Familiar Feelings of Ethnic Itemsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160454-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gender and Ethnic Subgroup Differences in Preference, Daily Usage, and Familiar Feelings of Ethnic Items </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Son, Gwi-Ryung</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 400 N. Ingalls, Room 2160, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Among immigrant ethnic groups, the critical factors in adjusting in the U.S. appear to be language and cultural differences. The racial and ethnic differences in health behavior of Asian American (AA) subgroups indicate a need for more specific information pertaining to a subgroup than a general group. The purpose of this study was to explore gender and ethnic subgroup differences in preference, daily usage, and familiar feelings of ethnic items among AA. A convenience sample of 193 AA (Korean: 85; Chinese: 23; Asian Indian: 37; Taiwanese: 48) was recruited from Michigan and Ohio. Males showed significantly higher level of perceived language ability in English than females. Although there was no difference in educational level among subgroups, KA were the youngest and the shortest stayed in the U.S. and they showed the lowest level of perceived language ability in English. There were no subgroup differences in total preference, but significant group differences were found in daily usage and familiar feelings of ethnic items, especially ethnic clothes, foods, and objects. Health professionals and policy makers should consider ethnicity while planning and developing culturally sensitive and effective health programs. AN: MN030178 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:57:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:57:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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