Sleep Complaints and Objective Measures of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160458
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sleep Complaints and Objective Measures of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Older Adults
Abstract:
Sleep Complaints and Objective Measures of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Suen, lee-jen
Contact Address:CON, 209 Carroll St, Mary E. Gladwin Hall, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA
Daytime sleepiness and other sleep complaints are common among older adults. Some of these complaints, however, may be related to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) rather than sleep-wake patterns changing with age. The prevalence of OSA is higher in older adults than the general population. This study is a secondary data analysis; data originally collected for clinical purposes were used to examine the relationship between sleep complaints and objective measures of OSA in patients age 50 and older. The study sample consists of 18 women and 32 men who completed the Patient Sleep Questionnaire and also underwent overnight polysomnography in a sleep laboratory. Three objective measurements of OSA were apnea hypopnea index (AHI), % of time SO2 less than 90, and minimum SO2. Among the 50 subjects, age ranged from 50 to 77 (M=57.9, SD=6.8), body mass index (BMI) ranged from 23.0 to 60.8 (M=33.1, SD=8.0), 94% reported snoring, and 62% had excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). AHI ranged from 0-121.4 (M=34.5, SD=32.2), % of time SO2 less than 90 ranged from 0 to 100 (M=20.0, SD=24.2), and minimum SO2 ranged from 56 to 95 (M=79.2, SD=9.9). Correlation analysis showed that EDS was associated with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (r=.28, p<.05). Falling asleep while talking correlated with AHI (r=.37, p<.01) and percentage of time SO2 below 90 (r=.58, p<.001). Falling asleep while watching TV correlated with AHI (r=.28, p<.05). Choking during sleep correlated with AHI (r=.28, p<.05). BMI correlated positively with percentage of time SO2 below 90 (r=.05, p<.01), and minimum SO2 (r=-.30, p<.05). Sleep apnea is associated with increased morbidity and increased mortality. Health care providers should be aware that sleep complaints are sometimes a sign of OSA, and not just a part of normal aging, especially for overweight patients. When diagnosed, OSA is a disorder that can be successfully treated. AN: MN030329
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSleep Complaints and Objective Measures of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160458-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sleep Complaints and Objective Measures of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Older Adults </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Suen, lee-jen</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 209 Carroll St, Mary E. Gladwin Hall, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Daytime sleepiness and other sleep complaints are common among older adults. Some of these complaints, however, may be related to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) rather than sleep-wake patterns changing with age. The prevalence of OSA is higher in older adults than the general population. This study is a secondary data analysis; data originally collected for clinical purposes were used to examine the relationship between sleep complaints and objective measures of OSA in patients age 50 and older. The study sample consists of 18 women and 32 men who completed the Patient Sleep Questionnaire and also underwent overnight polysomnography in a sleep laboratory. Three objective measurements of OSA were apnea hypopnea index (AHI), % of time SO2 less than 90, and minimum SO2. Among the 50 subjects, age ranged from 50 to 77 (M=57.9, SD=6.8), body mass index (BMI) ranged from 23.0 to 60.8 (M=33.1, SD=8.0), 94% reported snoring, and 62% had excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). AHI ranged from 0-121.4 (M=34.5, SD=32.2), % of time SO2 less than 90 ranged from 0 to 100 (M=20.0, SD=24.2), and minimum SO2 ranged from 56 to 95 (M=79.2, SD=9.9). Correlation analysis showed that EDS was associated with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (r=.28, p&lt;.05). Falling asleep while talking correlated with AHI (r=.37, p&lt;.01) and percentage of time SO2 below 90 (r=.58, p&lt;.001). Falling asleep while watching TV correlated with AHI (r=.28, p&lt;.05). Choking during sleep correlated with AHI (r=.28, p&lt;.05). BMI correlated positively with percentage of time SO2 below 90 (r=.05, p&lt;.01), and minimum SO2 (r=-.30, p&lt;.05). Sleep apnea is associated with increased morbidity and increased mortality. Health care providers should be aware that sleep complaints are sometimes a sign of OSA, and not just a part of normal aging, especially for overweight patients. When diagnosed, OSA is a disorder that can be successfully treated. AN: MN030329 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:57:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:57:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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