Feasibility and Validity of Measuring Physical Activity with a Pedometer in Community-Dwelling Older Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160462
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Feasibility and Validity of Measuring Physical Activity with a Pedometer in Community-Dwelling Older Women
Abstract:
Feasibility and Validity of Measuring Physical Activity with a Pedometer in Community-Dwelling Older Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Talley, Kristine
Contact Address:SON, 31805 Elmwood Trail, Stacy, MN, 55079, USA
Co-Authors:Jean F. Wyman; Jennifer A. Peters; Helen A. Reid
Pedometers may be useful for evaluating physical activity in older women involved in an exercise intervention. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and validity of using an electronic pedometer to measure physical activity with 74 community-dwelling women age >69 years (mean age=80, SD=6.3). Subjects were asked to wear a pedometer (Digiwalker, San Jose, CA) for three consecutive days and record selected pedometer readings (miles walked) on a written log. They received verbal and written instructions on pedometer use and log completion. Feasibility was evaluated by pedometer use adherence rates and qualitative analysis of problems encountered using the pedometer. Over one-third (n=26) of the subjects experienced one or more problems using the pedometer. Ten subjects (13.5%) did not wear the pedometer for the entire three days. Six (8.1%) subjects recorded steps or calories instead of distance. Five (6.8%) subjects wore the pedometer, but were unable to interpret the display and record data on their log. Two subjects (2.7%) either lost or forgot to wear the pedometer. One subject (1.4%) was completely unable to use the pedometer. Validity was examined by comparing the total miles walked in three days with the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE). The average number of miles walked in three days was 3.5 (SD=2.6). The mean PASE score was 86.7 (SD=44.9). For the 64 subjects (86%) where a 3-day total distance walked was available, the log was positively correlated with the PASE (r=.459, p=. 01). We conclude that it is feasible to use pedometers to measure physical activity in older women. Over 86% of the subjects were compliant and most problems encountered did not affect the ability to obtain a three-day total distance walked to use for evaluation. The pedometer is valid when compared to PASE scores. AN: MN030176
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFeasibility and Validity of Measuring Physical Activity with a Pedometer in Community-Dwelling Older Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160462-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Feasibility and Validity of Measuring Physical Activity with a Pedometer in Community-Dwelling Older Women </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Talley, Kristine</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 31805 Elmwood Trail, Stacy, MN, 55079, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jean F. Wyman; Jennifer A. Peters; Helen A. Reid </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pedometers may be useful for evaluating physical activity in older women involved in an exercise intervention. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and validity of using an electronic pedometer to measure physical activity with 74 community-dwelling women age &gt;69 years (mean age=80, SD=6.3). Subjects were asked to wear a pedometer (Digiwalker, San Jose, CA) for three consecutive days and record selected pedometer readings (miles walked) on a written log. They received verbal and written instructions on pedometer use and log completion. Feasibility was evaluated by pedometer use adherence rates and qualitative analysis of problems encountered using the pedometer. Over one-third (n=26) of the subjects experienced one or more problems using the pedometer. Ten subjects (13.5%) did not wear the pedometer for the entire three days. Six (8.1%) subjects recorded steps or calories instead of distance. Five (6.8%) subjects wore the pedometer, but were unable to interpret the display and record data on their log. Two subjects (2.7%) either lost or forgot to wear the pedometer. One subject (1.4%) was completely unable to use the pedometer. Validity was examined by comparing the total miles walked in three days with the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE). The average number of miles walked in three days was 3.5 (SD=2.6). The mean PASE score was 86.7 (SD=44.9). For the 64 subjects (86%) where a 3-day total distance walked was available, the log was positively correlated with the PASE (r=.459, p=. 01). We conclude that it is feasible to use pedometers to measure physical activity in older women. Over 86% of the subjects were compliant and most problems encountered did not affect the ability to obtain a three-day total distance walked to use for evaluation. The pedometer is valid when compared to PASE scores. AN: MN030176</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:57:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:57:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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