2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160464
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Discovering the Meaning of Life in Early Stages of Dementia
Abstract:
Discovering the Meaning of Life in Early Stages of Dementia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Thorlton, Janet
Contact Address:CON, 3029 Golf Circle, Danville, IL, 61832, USA
Co-Authors:Sandy C. Burgener
Despite the rising incidence (>65 years=12%; >85=47.9%) of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), no systematic study has examined personal and psychological factors associated with quality of life (QoL) outcomes as persons progress through disease stages. The purpose of this study was to gain understanding of the meaning of living with early stage AD. Persons newly diagnosed (<1 year) with Alzheimer’s were recruited from rural and urban outpatient settings. Responses from a subset of 21 participants (total N=96) in early to middle disease stages were analyzed to answer the following research question: What is the meaning of the disease to a person in early stages of AD? Content analysis of open-ended interview responses was utilized throughout this 4-year longitudinal study (interviews conducted bi-annually) to examine the meaning of the disease. Transcribed interviews were entered into NVivo for coding and analysis. Consistency in responses over multiple interviews supports the meaning and reliability of responses. To describe the meaning of AD, study participants identified difficulty with: withdrawal of previously positive relationships; communicating with spouse, family, and friends; embarrassment over memory loss with attempts to “cover up” losses; loss of independence, especially driving; becoming more emotionally sensitive; frustration over difficulty in performing tasks; and changes in role function. Persons with AD identify strongly with the disease, even early in the disease, consistently describing themselves in negative terms, such as stupid, dumb, or useless, despite having functioned at high levels (judges, physicians, etc.) prior to disease diagnosis. Study findings reveal the impact of AD on multiple aspects of individuals' lives. Using meaningful responses gleaned from this study, healthcare providers can seek and utilize information from persons with dementia to develop individualized interventions. Future research is warranted to investigate relationships between this study's findings and conceptualizations of self-concept and QoL. AN: MN030013
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiscovering the Meaning of Life in Early Stages of Dementiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160464-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Discovering the Meaning of Life in Early Stages of Dementia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thorlton, Janet</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 3029 Golf Circle, Danville, IL, 61832, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sandy C. Burgener</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Despite the rising incidence (&gt;65 years=12%; &gt;85=47.9%) of Alzheimer&rsquo;s Disease (AD), no systematic study has examined personal and psychological factors associated with quality of life (QoL) outcomes as persons progress through disease stages. The purpose of this study was to gain understanding of the meaning of living with early stage AD. Persons newly diagnosed (&lt;1 year) with Alzheimer&rsquo;s were recruited from rural and urban outpatient settings. Responses from a subset of 21 participants (total N=96) in early to middle disease stages were analyzed to answer the following research question: What is the meaning of the disease to a person in early stages of AD? Content analysis of open-ended interview responses was utilized throughout this 4-year longitudinal study (interviews conducted bi-annually) to examine the meaning of the disease. Transcribed interviews were entered into NVivo for coding and analysis. Consistency in responses over multiple interviews supports the meaning and reliability of responses. To describe the meaning of AD, study participants identified difficulty with: withdrawal of previously positive relationships; communicating with spouse, family, and friends; embarrassment over memory loss with attempts to &ldquo;cover up&rdquo; losses; loss of independence, especially driving; becoming more emotionally sensitive; frustration over difficulty in performing tasks; and changes in role function. Persons with AD identify strongly with the disease, even early in the disease, consistently describing themselves in negative terms, such as stupid, dumb, or useless, despite having functioned at high levels (judges, physicians, etc.) prior to disease diagnosis. Study findings reveal the impact of AD on multiple aspects of individuals' lives. Using meaningful responses gleaned from this study, healthcare providers can seek and utilize information from persons with dementia to develop individualized interventions. Future research is warranted to investigate relationships between this study's findings and conceptualizations of self-concept and QoL. AN: MN030013</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:58:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:58:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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