Health Professionals and Low-Income Women: Providing Support for Physical Activity and Healthy Eating

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160468
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Professionals and Low-Income Women: Providing Support for Physical Activity and Healthy Eating
Abstract:
Health Professionals and Low-Income Women: Providing Support for Physical Activity and Healthy Eating
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Walcott-McQuigg, Jacqueline
Contact Address:SON, 1337 Johnson Hall, Room 117A, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-1337, USA
Co-Authors:Aeree Choi
Women, especially women with lower income and education levels, account for the majority of persons 20 years and older with Type 2 diabetes. Lower education and income levels are associated with physical inactivity and unhealthy eating, leading to obesity and increased risk for Type 2 diabetes. In addition to the human cost of diabetes, the economic cost of acute and long-term complications of diabetes is approximately 100 billion dollars. Therefore, health professionals are concerned not only with the treatment, but also the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine psychosocial and physiological factors influencing physical inactivity and unhealthy eating behavior among a convenience sample of 400 culturally diverse women (African-American, Caucasian, Hispanic [Mexican, Puerto Rican], Native American), aged 30 to 63 years at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. Women were recruited from community service agencies in a Midwestern Metropolitan area. Questionnaires that included closed and open-ended questions were translated into Spanish and administered to the women by bilingual research team members. Thematic analysis and descriptive statistics were used to analyze responses to the open-ended questions, “What can health professionals do to assist you to increase your physical activity?” and “What can health professionals do to assist you to increase healthy eating behavior?” The women identified over 20 categories of support that could be provided for both physical activity and healthy eating. The categories were classified into environmental or individual level factors using an ecological conceptual framework. The ecological factors varied in importance among the cultural groups. The study findings can be used by health professionals to plan physical activity and healthy eating programs for low-income culturally diverse women. AN: MN030187
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Professionals and Low-Income Women: Providing Support for Physical Activity and Healthy Eatingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160468-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Professionals and Low-Income Women: Providing Support for Physical Activity and Healthy Eating</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Walcott-McQuigg, Jacqueline</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1337 Johnson Hall, Room 117A, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-1337, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Aeree Choi</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Women, especially women with lower income and education levels, account for the majority of persons 20 years and older with Type 2 diabetes. Lower education and income levels are associated with physical inactivity and unhealthy eating, leading to obesity and increased risk for Type 2 diabetes. In addition to the human cost of diabetes, the economic cost of acute and long-term complications of diabetes is approximately 100 billion dollars. Therefore, health professionals are concerned not only with the treatment, but also the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine psychosocial and physiological factors influencing physical inactivity and unhealthy eating behavior among a convenience sample of 400 culturally diverse women (African-American, Caucasian, Hispanic [Mexican, Puerto Rican], Native American), aged 30 to 63 years at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. Women were recruited from community service agencies in a Midwestern Metropolitan area. Questionnaires that included closed and open-ended questions were translated into Spanish and administered to the women by bilingual research team members. Thematic analysis and descriptive statistics were used to analyze responses to the open-ended questions, &ldquo;What can health professionals do to assist you to increase your physical activity?&rdquo; and &ldquo;What can health professionals do to assist you to increase healthy eating behavior?&rdquo; The women identified over 20 categories of support that could be provided for both physical activity and healthy eating. The categories were classified into environmental or individual level factors using an ecological conceptual framework. The ecological factors varied in importance among the cultural groups. The study findings can be used by health professionals to plan physical activity and healthy eating programs for low-income culturally diverse women. AN: MN030187</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:58:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:58:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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