HIV Positive women & health promoting practices: Similarities and Differences based on Racial Identity

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160469
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HIV Positive women & health promoting practices: Similarities and Differences based on Racial Identity
Abstract:
HIV Positive women & health promoting practices: Similarities and Differences based on Racial Identity
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Weems, Brenda
Contact Address:Mary Gladwin Hall,, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA
Statement of the Problem: Women account for 32% of the newly diagnosed cases of HIV and of those, 77% are minorities. Little is known about the health promoting practices (HPP) of HIV+ impoverished women. Even less is known about how or if race influences HPP. This multimethod study was designed to explore similarities and/or differences in these women based on racial identity (RI). Theoretical Framework: Cross’ theoretical development of RI provided the framework for this study. RI refers to one’s self-identification with an established racial group. RI may be influenced by psychosocial conditions such as racism, oppression, prejudice, discrimination and other life experiences that can influence HPP. Methodology: Seven HIV+ women participated in this pilot study: 2 African Americans (AA), 2 Hispanic Americans (HA), and 3 Euro Americans (EA). Data on HPP were collected with the Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP II); subscales include health responsibility, physical activity, nutrition, spiritual growth, interpersonal relationships, and stress management. Qualitative data were collected using individual face-to-face semi-structured interviews. HPLP II and socio-demographic data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The nonparametric ANOVA test (Kruskal-Wallis) was used to examine differences in HPP based on RI. Thematic analysis, a phenomenological approach used to extrapolate themes, was used to evaluate qualitative data and to inform quantitative findings. Results: Although statistically significant differences in HPP based on RI were not found, HA consistently scored lower on the HPLP II subscales. AA and EA reported similar mean scores for stress management and spiritual growth. Qualitative analysis revealed most of the minority women reported racial, ethnic or cultural concerns with respect to their HPP, HIV+ or socioeconomic status. Implications: Nurses must recognize that HIV+ impoverished women have differences in HPP that may require provision of culturally competent care. Future research may include measures to assess levels of racial identity to evaluate within and between group differences using a larger sample size. AN: MN030023
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHIV Positive women & health promoting practices: Similarities and Differences based on Racial Identityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160469-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">HIV Positive women &amp; health promoting practices: Similarities and Differences based on Racial Identity </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weems, Brenda</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Mary Gladwin Hall,, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Statement of the Problem: Women account for 32% of the newly diagnosed cases of HIV and of those, 77% are minorities. Little is known about the health promoting practices (HPP) of HIV+ impoverished women. Even less is known about how or if race influences HPP. This multimethod study was designed to explore similarities and/or differences in these women based on racial identity (RI). Theoretical Framework: Cross&rsquo; theoretical development of RI provided the framework for this study. RI refers to one&rsquo;s self-identification with an established racial group. RI may be influenced by psychosocial conditions such as racism, oppression, prejudice, discrimination and other life experiences that can influence HPP. Methodology: Seven HIV+ women participated in this pilot study: 2 African Americans (AA), 2 Hispanic Americans (HA), and 3 Euro Americans (EA). Data on HPP were collected with the Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP II); subscales include health responsibility, physical activity, nutrition, spiritual growth, interpersonal relationships, and stress management. Qualitative data were collected using individual face-to-face semi-structured interviews. HPLP II and socio-demographic data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The nonparametric ANOVA test (Kruskal-Wallis) was used to examine differences in HPP based on RI. Thematic analysis, a phenomenological approach used to extrapolate themes, was used to evaluate qualitative data and to inform quantitative findings. Results: Although statistically significant differences in HPP based on RI were not found, HA consistently scored lower on the HPLP II subscales. AA and EA reported similar mean scores for stress management and spiritual growth. Qualitative analysis revealed most of the minority women reported racial, ethnic or cultural concerns with respect to their HPP, HIV+ or socioeconomic status. Implications: Nurses must recognize that HIV+ impoverished women have differences in HPP that may require provision of culturally competent care. Future research may include measures to assess levels of racial identity to evaluate within and between group differences using a larger sample size. AN: MN030023 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:58:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:58:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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